OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 10, 1912, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-02-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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isPITCHING Value of Great Battery Men Easy to Understand
"liy Work of Washington Team at Times. . !
:te.
I
By Billy Evans
.Few really great baseball
teams are shy on battery men.
Good pitching and good catch
ing cut a big figure in every bat
tle of the diamond.
-Few teams have)won pennants
unless well fortified back of the
bat and in the pitchers' box. No
matter how many runs 'a team
may make, they are wasted if the
opposition makes one more.
M any national league critics in
sist that the Cubs would have cut
a big swath last year had the
pitchers not failed. Many look
on the team's showing as remark
able', considering the pitching
staff.-
Detroit suffered because of a
pitching slump. The Cubs and
the Tigers, the .scores show, lost
many games when they made
five, six, seven and eight runs.
Something is wrong somewhere
when so many runs fail to win.
The late Addie Joss, a great
student of the game, once said
pitching was seven-tenths of a
club's strength. Many scoffed at
this, but Addie was not far out of
the way.
Take last year's Washington
club for example. Let an ordi
nary pitcher do the twirling and
the club was was not greatly
feared. Let Walter Johnson step
on the rubber and the club be
came dangerous. Aside from the
strength added by Johnson's
pitching his very presence gave
i,m
PAVJL TMOM i
Christy Mathewson.
confidence to every member of
the team.
The catcher plays so big a part

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