OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 21, 1912, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-02-21/ed-1/seq-14/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

itvt,"sf ' i
" iB
Ts- rJf
"f TW ' ' ff WW
h
'.
adhered to nis vegetable diet and
his arms were covered with boils
to an extent that he had to call
off the bout. Dr. James Frew,
who examined Welsh, said he
Would become consumptive un
less he changed his training
methods.
He ordered juicy beefsteaks
and after gating them Welsh
rapidly regained his health. The
strain of training, Dr. Frew says,
demands the most nutritious
foods -arid Welsh always confined
himself to vegetables-when prer
paring for a, battle, which may be
at the bottom of his present diffi
culty. Johnny .Thompson's victory
over Jack Lester must have been
sweet to the Illinois cyclone, who
lost decisions to Bandsman Rice
and Dave Smith. It was a life
saver for Thompson and the fin
ish of Lester. Johnny may now
get on with Lartgford.
Sid Smith, the English "ban
tam, will get a real tryout when
he meets Johnny Daly. Daly has
met all the good ones, including
Champion Coulon.
If Willie Lewis is in, a fighting
mood Friday, he will make Mike
Gibbons step lively. At times
Willie boxes like the rankest dub.
Let's hope he is right, if only to
bring out Mike's best.
o o
'Twill take more than that second-hand
clothes store smile to
make Oscar Underwood much of
a candidate.
,
BILLY EVANS SAYS
In a few years advertising
signs, will not be found inside
major league park fences. Not
so many years ago these signs
were a feature to which club own
ers catered, to increase their in
come. The coming of half million dol
lar parks, however, spelled the
death of the advertising signs
For a time it was customary
for advertisers to offer rewards
for "hitting their signs with a
batted ball. Some of the rewards
were humorous.
I remember one man who of
fered a hat to the player hitting
a hat, which was no larger than
a 'regulation derb$ I don't be
lieve anyone could have hit that
sign with a shot gun, let alone a
batted "ball. Instead of bringing
business it drove patrons away,
from the advertiser.
Another thing that has doomed
the signs is that an array of
brightly colored signs affect the
batter's eyes.
I remember a game irt Chicago,
soon, after the completion of the
new park, in which the visiting
players were at sea before the
pitching of Walsh, Scott and
White.
' In three games this trio struck
out 37 batters. Walsh got 16,
Scott a dozen and White 10. The
Chicago players, a bit more used
to the grounds, did .not fan so
much. A large sign, since re
moved, was the cause of the
wholesale strikeouts.

xml | txt