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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 28, 1912, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-02-28/ed-1/seq-13/

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WEAVING A POPULAR OCCUPATION WITH CHILDREN
Children love to weave. The
illustrations show paper weaving
mats for the kindergarten child
and raffia and yarn-weaving "for
those a year or two older. The
weaving is all simple. UIDER
ONE and OVER ONE thread.
These mats alj help to furriish
the doll's house; the yarn mats
are also good table mats. The pa
per mats may be made into trays
and baskets, and the raffia ones
into bags. , '
To make the paper mat, fold a
piece of strong paper'irito an ob
long, cut slashes from the doubled
edge up to within half.an inch oL
the opposite edges; open the.'mat
and weave with stripe of a con
trasting color. '
The woolen loom for the yarn
mats was made with carpenter's
tools by a child. It is 1 by 12
inches the wood three quarters
of an inch thick and one and a
half inches wide. The WARP of
strong cord is strungback and
forth between two round notched
Sticks, which1 are tied securely to
the frame. Holes or nails in the
frame could be used instead. v A,
slate frame will make a loom.
To remove the finished work
from the loom, cut the warp
'threads close to the round sticks ;
and tie them m couples over'the

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