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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 08, 1912, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-03-08/ed-1/seq-7/

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"WJ&fF? r 'TpV'Jlsr--
cott all the liars he pleasef, and
Scott isiwelcdme to come back q.t
him? " ' "
We-are out.
, , ; u y; -
THE SHELSS WOOING OF ORED, CLQUDBY THE
. ' t' lt" EAD MY CARRUTHERS
A Tale of thePineTreeTLandl of theFar-North.and a Man and a,
, WomanWHch -Ibo, Explains' thejCelibacy
' ' " ofcMy Lord aftforcL .
-oor
t
- ,
. .
t By Donald MctQreor- -I'met
him.' in Stumps -Dan's
place. ;A long ma'n lie was", Vith
loose joints and a'tanned'face and
far away eyes, that ;were 'all
wrinkled at the corners, after the
fashion o the eyes of men who
have lived much-in-the wide plac--e's
of the wdrld. -
We had been -telling each oth
er -what a great mistake a mar
riage between a man and a wom
an of different color was, and
Wooden-Legged rDonohue had
lecome quite excited about it.
f "ItVworse than a mistake,"'he
cried, thumping thetable. "It's
a crime, and there ought to bea
law against it." i
J It ws then the lonj manfjrst
entered ihtb'.the conversation. He
moved in his chair.
"Tha't's all piffle,'" he said. ' -
" "WHat d'ye mean?" demanded
jWooden-L'egged Donohue? fierce
ly. , J r
4 "1 spoke English, didn't I?"
sjiid the lqng- man, and looked at
poor Donohue,as If he were some
freak out of a circus.
v There wa"s silence
ment then, and. the
diewhis chair' closer.
"1 will tell you a storyof a
for a mo
long man
hiied marriage"," he said, "and
omhe most shameless' wooing of
an Indian by a white woman of
high degree, and -at, the end of the
storyf you, can pass your resolu
tions. "This happened twenty-five
years ago. T Was in the North
westMounted Police at'the time,
and for a year J had been station
ed at a'pot on the very boundary
of the Indian country.
' "I had come to know the In
dians, and some of them called
me'fiiiend. ' One.of these was Red
Gland, chief of the northern
Sioux. ' ' '
'l always had-liked Red Cloud,
although the first time I met him,,
hie' and I had nearly mixed! But'
that' was before I knew anything
about Indiansand I didn't comq
at 'him rightj and he thought I
was trying to insult him.
"Me was a big man, standing
Well over six feet, and he had the
slim, active body of a trained
fighter. His muscles moved like
ripples under his skjn.
"He was the least talkative In
dian I ever" knew, which means
that he oqly opened his mputh,
fdr any other reason than to put
fdcfd in ftabout once a week. And
-JL'-A
jj
A i 4
v
mmmmmmmmmm

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