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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 20, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAY BOOK
500 SO. PEORIA ST
398
TEL. MONROE 353
Vol. 1, No. 150 Chicago, Wednesday, March 20, 1912 - One Cent
WOMEN HIDE. JEWELS
AS TRAIN IS ROBBED
Stockings, Hats and Shoes
Are Filled With Valua-.
hies Before Rob
, bers Arrive.
St. Louis, Mo., March 20. A
thrilling, story of the hold-up of
Mobile & Ohio passenger train
No. 4 near Corinth, Miss., by four
robbers last night was, told here
today by -passengers arriving on
the train, which was stopped in
.the swamps along the Tuscumbia
river. -
The safe1 in the express car was
blown open and the robbers es
caped with its entire, contents.
The amount is said to be 860,000.
Express Messenger - William
Snoddy arrived with his car, but
reiusea to say now mucn tne pan
dits secured.
Many of the passengers on the
train were women. Mrs. G. S.
Davis of Columbus, Miss., a dele
gate to the National .Mothers'
" Congress, in session here, said:
"There were about 2 passen
gers in the -car. Conductor
O'Hara ran down the asile shout
ing. 'Hide your valuables, the
train is'held up.'
"We thought he was joking,
but soon heard an explosion.
Then the. hiding. of nidney .and
jewelry began in earnest. Wom
en jammed valuables in their
stockings, .hats, shoes, under tne
car seat5, or any place they could
be put quickly."
The 'Jobbery was unparalleled
for' boldness. Just beforelreach
ing Corinth, twS men climbed
over'the tender and two entered
the express car. The first inti
mation the engineer had of trou
ble was when he felt a' pull at his
suspenders. He'turned and look
ed info thevmuzzle of a revolver.
The fireman was covered, and the
train was ordered brought to a
stop.
In the meantime, tjje other two
bandits had tied up, the express
messenger, and fixed the explo
sives under the safe by the time
the engine was stopped.' The
safe was blown, jthe, robbers gath
ered up its contents, and fled.
Mail was not tampered with.
Bloodhoundshave been put on
the trail of tKero1)bers but the
river bottoms ate covered with
dense underbrush, and pursuit is
difficult.
Judging from the thousands of
dollars of advertising the loan
sharks are running daily in The
News, The Tribune hasn't yet run
them out, of business. Will The
News keep its mouth shut as long
as it-gets the money? - f

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