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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 26, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-03-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAY BOOK
500 SO. PEORIA. ST ; y.'398 ; TEL. MONROE 353
Vol. 1, NoMSS- Chicago, Tuesday, March 26, 1912 One, Cent
"LAWRENCE STRIKE" THREATENS LOWELL
sThe , Mill Owners 'of Another Massachusetts Town
Refuse Demands of Workers and' 2000 Walk
Out Bosses Failed Jo "Slip One Over."
Soon after the mill closed down
over. 5,000 . strikers formed into
Lowell, Mass., March 26i
The story of Lawrence the
story of children torn 'from the
breasts of their mothers, of moth
ers .clubbed and thrqwn. into jail
without trial, of men and women
bayonetted by a briltal soldiery
may be repeated in ths city. .
Yesterday 2,Q00 operatives m
ployedin the Appleton mijl went
on strike on the refusal of th'e
owners of the" mill to treat with
them in regard to a wage in
crease. The mill "was forced' to
close down. v .
Today, the city awoke to find
every mill in town under a heavy
guard of armed special officers.
When the workers floclced to the
mills it was to face notices whidh
read:
"On account of the strike at
the Appleton arid other mills, this
mil will close down.
Only 4 one mill did-tnot join in
the lockout. That was the' mill
operated by- the - Lawrence 'com
pany! . " --...
v The action of the mill owners
will throw '30,000 workers out q'f
employment and there seems to
be no4iope of arbitration,-
parade and. marched through the
business streets. Women and lit
tle, boys and girls, whose scanty
clothing was the most convinc
ing argument of the justice of
their parents' demands, headed
the procession.
Men and -women in the parade
carried American flags and "ban
ners which 'read :
"We want a Hying wage. Give
us 15 per cent increase."
There was no disorder.
After the parade was over
Chief of Police Welch announced
that he would'-not'permit either
William D Haywood, nor any of
the pther men who led "the strike
at Lawrence to enter the city. '
, Welch, did not say by what
right'he would preventan Amer
ican citizen.from entering Lowell.
He just -said that, any leader of
the Lawrence 'strike would be re
garded as an undesirable citizen,
as a vagrant, and treated"accord-
ingy. 7 s-'
That is, if any of the men who
carried'the'Strike of the Lawrence
4. workers toisuccess, come to L$w-
HHHHHIHHBHiH

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