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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, June 14, 1912, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-06-14/ed-1/seq-13/

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THE DRAGON SLAYER.
Once there was a young man of
great strength who left his home
and traveled into a far country in
quest of adventure. The tale tells
that he came to a city at the foot
of a mountain, where lived a good
king named Lopmenugun and hjs
beautiful daughter, the Princess
Anastasia.
On Entering the city the young
man heard sounds of weeping
everywhere, and all the houses
were draped in mourning. Pres
ently he came to a cobbler's shop
and entered. The old cobbler was
weeping as if his heart, would
break.
' "Why do you weep, old man?"
the traveler asked. '
"What!" exclaimed the cobbler.
"Have you not heard? You are a
stranger, then. I will tell you. On
the top of the mountain lives a
"dragon which has seven heads. Its
scales sire a foot thick and harder
than any steel. r
"Each year the king chooses
from the young women of the
kingdom she who is the most
beautiful and sends her up the
mountain, and the dragon eats
her. Then we are safe for another
year. If we do not give the dragon
our most beautiful woman to eat,
once a year, the dragon will come
down and eat us."
"Why, then," the young man
asked, "does .not some brave man
go up and slay the dragon?"1
The cobbler sighed. "Surely
you come from afar. Many young
men havetned it, for the king of-
fers half his kingdom to him who
shall slay the dragon. But what
sword shall cut through the
dragon's scales? Half way up the
side of the mountain is a huge
granite block under which lies a
sword. This sword only is hrciyy
and sharp enough tof cut The
dragon's scales. No man has yet
been found who can move the
stone. He who can move the stone
can wield the sword, and he who
can wield the sword can slay the
dragon. Woe is me, I think he
does not live."
"Go on," said the young man.
The cobbler wept afresh. "To
day 'is the day and it is well
known that of all the beautiful
women left in the kingdom the
most beautiful is the Princess An
atasia herself. The king is frantic
with grief, and offers n6t only
half his kingdom, but the hand of
his daughter as well, to him who
shall slay the dragon."
"This is indeed good news,"
said the young man, and, laugh
ing, left the cobbler too angry for
tears.
The traveler straightway went
before the king" and said:
"Your majesty, I will slay the
dragon."
Weeping, the king answered:
"Go, rash young man. Bring me
the seven tongues of the dragon
and I will give you my daughter
and. half my kingdom."
"I will bring back the seven
tongues," the young man said,
"and on my return I will name my
reward."
Then he started up the moun-tainside.
j

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