OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 04, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-07-04/ed-1/seq-2/

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the copy of the Union Labor Ad
vocate in which was this "state
ment" all over Chicago.
They were particularly careful
"to circulate the paper among such
union men and women of Chicago
as were not acquainted with the
true situation in the newspaper
lockout and strike.
Last night the Chicago Allied
Printing Trades Council, in regu
lar session, gave its answer to
that "statement," and to the men
who circulated it. The council, by
the adoption of the following mo
tion, presented by Delegate L. P.
Straube, branded the "statement"
in 'the Union Labor Advocate as
untrue :
"1 move you, Mr. President,
that the Chicago Allied Print
ing Trades Council, in regular
session assembled, denounce
the action of the Union Labor
Advocate and the action of the
organization that is aiding the
Chicago Publishers' Associa
tion by a widespread circula
tion of a document that is not
true in its entirety, and is di
rectly opposed and antagonistic
to organizations whose strike
was endorsed by the Chicago
Council."
The delegates from the Typo
graphical Union were on their
feet immediately to fight the mo
tion. The delegates from the
Mailers' Union, the other union
which left the locked-out and
striking printing trades in the
lurch, ' helped the typographical
delegates out.
But when the motion was put
it. was carried without a dissent
ing voice save those of the Typo
graphical and Mailers' delegates,
the men repreesnting the men
whom the motion accused of be
traying the cause of Union Labor.
CRY-BABY HEARSt.
Hearst is a cry-baby.
He cut no ice at Baltimore.
Nobody paid any attention to
him. Nobody was afraid of him.
And the convention turned down ,
his candidate.
He- knuckled down to Boss
Murphy, and it didn't get him
anything.
He knuckled down to Roger
Sullivan, and that got him nothing.
Now, after villifying Wilson
all through a-long campaign, the
big boob chews his own words,
supports Wilson and tries to
square himself by roasting Bryan.
They say a cat may look at a
king, and perhaps it may afford
Hearst the same satisfaction to
roast Bryan. But it won't get-the
labor-baiting Hearst anywhere or
anything.
He comes about as near being a
dead one as anything we've seen
at large in a long time.
o o
Jane I've toldyou over and
over again I will have cleanliness;
yet why is it I'm always finding
cobwebs on the drawing-room
ceiling?"
"I think it must be the spider.
miss."
Willie Hearst might oh, well,
what's the use kicking a fellow
when he's buried?
'
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