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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 12, 1912, Image 15

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-07-12/ed-1/seq-15/

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J.. . , 0-O-CMD! RASPBERRY JAM!
Red Raspberry Jam. - No. 1.
Allow, three-quarters of a
pound of sugar to a pound of
fruit. Put the berries on alone
and boil for half an hour, stirring
hard and often. Dip out the su
perfluous juice, add the sugar and
cook twenty minutes longer. Put
in jars or glasses.
Red-Raspberry Jam. No. 2.
To every pound of raspberries
allow a pound of sugar, and to
whatever portion of raspberries
used allow one-fourth weight of
currants. Wash and strain cur
rants and cook juice with the
sugar about twenty minutes.
Then add the raspberries whole,
simmering together twenty-five
minutes. Bottle and seal at once.
Red Raspberry Jam. No. 3.
Weigh berries and simmer
without water until reduced one
third, when add gradually as
BERNSTEIN'S PANTS.
Henri Bernstein, one of whose
plays was hissed and hooted out
of one of the great Parisian the
aters, is now the idol of the hour
on the great boulevards.
Doubtless recollecting that he
has written thiteen plays which
have been produced, the marvel
ous sense for the theater and for
stage trickery tliat some of them
displayed, even in a poor English
translation, you are certain that
Bernstein-has attained his pres
ent altitude of popularity in" the
Paris cafes by some wonderful
drama in which modern French
LD0M(j(Y"!
many pounds of heated sugar as
there were berries (original
weight). As soon as sugar is
melted thoroughly and has boiled
up once, place in jars and seal at
life is mordantly analyzed and re
vealed. Wrong, alPwrong!
The great triumph of the play
wright does not consist in his
plays, in his dramatic talent, but
in pants.
Every -dandy in Paris is mad
with envy, fo'r Henri has smashed
all records. He has 147 pairs of
trousers count 'em, 147 varieties
all colors, all shapes, all de
signs and a valet who does noth
else but look after them.
What is mere literature com
pared with such a sartorial triumph?
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