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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 20, 1912, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-07-20/ed-1/seq-18/

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t BASEBALL DOPE
Standing of the Clubs.
American League.' W. L. Pet.
Boston 60 27 .690
Washington 54 34 .614
Philadelphia 49 37 .570
Chiacgo 45 . 39 .536
Cleveland . . . 43544 .494
Detroit 42 45 .483
St. Louis 25 59 .298
New York 23 56 .291
National League. W. L. Pet.
New York 60 21 .741
Chicago 49 31 .613
Pittsburgh 47 33 .588
Cincinnati 43-41 .512
Philadelphia 38 39 .494
St. Louis 36 50 .419
Brooklyn 31 51 .378
Boston .-...23 61 .274
Yesterday's Results.
American League Boston &2,
Chicago 0-1; Detroit 8-6, Phila
delphia 6-14; Washington 5-10,
St. Louis 1-1 ; New York 4, Cleve
land 3.
National League Philadelphia
4, Chicago 0;New York 5-4, Pitts
burgh 4-5 ; Cincinnati 3, Boston 2 ;
St. Louis 6, Boston 4.'
Eppa Rixey and his aristocratic
shoots from the University of
Virginia were too much for the
Cubs, and Phils made it three out
of four on the series.
Three hits were all Rixey al
lowed, and he fanned nine of the
West Siders.
Vic Saier managed to whiff
three times in as many times up.
Jimmy Lavender hiked after
the third, when the Phils failed to
show respect due a Giant killer.
Chance is working the youngster
too often. Jim has taken part, in
three games in the last four days.
Lew Richie rescued Lavender
and did a goob job, the ninth
being the only inning in which he
was scored on.
Cravath, the pesky critter,
banged a couple more doubles
yesterday.
Paskert made the biggest fluke
of a homer ever seen on the West
Side. He drove a grounder to left,
and with great accuracy Sheck
ard caught the ball on his toe and
lifted it into the grandstand.
A homer by a foot, so they tell
us.
Charity compels us to say little
about the firstgame of the double
header the White Sox forced on
Boston yesterday.
If Benz had been able to pitch,
and if the rest of the Sox had been
able to hit and field, Boston might
not have won.
The Sox made six hits and six
errors
Harry Lord managed to get
but one hit. In the error line, how
ever, he excelled, mussing up
three chances.
Red Kuhn was the only real
batter, clubbing a pair of useless
doubles
Buck Weaver became jealous of
Harry Lord's prowess in the first
and equaled the captain's error
record in the second battle
Eddie Cicotte, secured from
Boston by the Sox, deserved to
win a victory against his old'pals.
He held them to eight hits in 12
0-

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