OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 30, 1912, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-07-30/ed-1/seq-19/

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clined to undertake an errand
which will be Worth $IbO to you?"
I sniiled. They understood that
smile.
"Then listen and I will explain.
You have, undoubtedly, seen
Crown Prince Ldthair of Hesse
Libau, whom you so strikingly re
semble?" "ExcepfTthat he is a trifle stout
er and darker," observed the
younger man. ''I know him very
well; still, the resemblance is un
doubted." "Allow hie, Fritz,' said the el
der, impatiently. "You have
heard the rumor of his engage
ment td Miss Helen Granard of
Washington, no doubt? Sheinet
him while traveling With her fath
er in Hesse-Libau last year. The
young people fell in love with
each other, arid the prince gave
her a. ring.
"Of course, the story was soon
bruited abroad. .The king vetoed
the match, and Mr. Granard also
behaved Very sensibly, rle took
his daughter back to America,
thinking that with the lapse of
time the affair would naturally
wear itself away.
Unfortunately, absehce only"
seemed to increase the.feeling be
tween the prince and Miss Gra
nard. It was fotind necessary, ih
fact, to seclude the young lady in
a private sanitarium here, in order
to prevent: her from holding com
munication with the young man.
Meanwhile the prince quarreled
with his father and announced his
intention of coining to America to
claim her. As yet he Has not done
so. All the European ports are
being watched ipj him, tnd, even
if he shduld arrive, he would
never be able to find her.
"l3ut it is riecessary"to getfback
the ring. Miss Granard declares
that she Will ohly give it" to the
prince if he coh)es in person to ask
for it. tf We Can get this ring from
her. and sehd it to the prince, it
will be proof td hini that she no
longer cares for him. In the inter
ests of the state""
"We warit you to get the ring,"
broke in the other attache, impa
tiently. I began to understand, t smiled
again.
"I see you understand thor
oughly! said the elder'man, with
obvious satisfaction. "Then you
must accompany us to the sani
tarium immediately. Wet shall
conceal ourselVes in an ante-room.
You will pass through and meet
Miss Granard in the next room.
You will say simply: 'I have come
for my ring. I care lor you no
longer. Knowing Miss Granard's
imperious disposition, I can guar
antee that she will ask. no ques
tions and you will be subjected to
nd inconvenience. The'Iighl will
be low and there will be no danger
of recognition.
"Onlyan old friend of the prince,
like myself, could'possibly detect
you," said the younger attache.
"And if you accomplish your
mission satis'factorilylhe embassy
will undoubtedly be able to put
you into a lucrative position, in
addition to this reward."
So saying, he handed me a rdll
of bills. I thrust them into my:
pocket
Uu&g-j
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