OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 10, 1912, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-08-10/ed-1/seq-11/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Day's Book's prophecy was on
. the blfnk.
But now it is easy to see why
the Tribune was for Frank Funk
a week ago and is against him
now.
The Tribune wanted to fool all
the Progressives and especially
Roosevelt until the national
convention was over.
Now that the national conven
tion is over, the Tribune doesn't
give a whoop in hades for the
local Progressives, and says so
plainly.
The Tribune is against the
Progressives locally for the same
' reason that Deneen is, for the
same reason that Bill Fljnn Is in
Pennsylvania.
Bill Flinn grabbed control of
the Pennsylvania Republican or
ganization from Boss Penrose.
If Flynn had gone the limit
with Roosevelt he would have
had to give up his control of that
organization. So Flinn welched.
Deneen controls the state Re
publican organization. If he had
kept his half promises and joined
Roosevelt he would have had to
give up that control. So Deneen
welched.
The Tribune controls Deneen,
and thus, lef t-handedljo the state
Republican organization.
The Tribune controls a good
part of the local county Repub
lican organization. -
If the Tribune had gone-the
limit with Roosevelt it would
have had to give up that control.
So the Tribune has welched.
But the Tribune wasn't so lion-
est in its welching as Deneen and
Flinn.
Deneen, after long straddling
of the fence, finally said definitely
that he was a Republican and
would support the Republican
nominees.
Flinn said from the first that he
would not support state or coun
ty tickets in Pennsylvania.
But the Tribune came out in
support of Frank Funk, in sup
port of a full state ticket put up
by the Progressives.
It waited until the national con
vention was over before saying a'
word against Frank Funk or,
county Progressive tickets.
And even today it tries to cover
its trail by hinting that the local
Progressives are allying them
selves with the worst part of the
Republican party.
Shouting Progressiveism and
damning the bosses nationally,
the Tribune is a standpatter and
the ally of the bosses locally.
The local Progressives oughii
to be made to understand fully
the game the Tribune is playing.
It has double-crossed them.
The Tribune is an expert dou-ble-crosser.
It hasn't done much'
else for years in politics, in its
dealings with organized labor, in
everything, t
When Father O'Callaghan of
St. Mary's denounced the Tri
bune from the platform as the
most criminal organization in
Chicago he made no mistake.
When Father O'Callaghan said
he loved a murderer because the
Master sa had commanded, but
that Hie despised the Tribune fori
VfiKMQnV uc Jiia A I- w- w .u- - . A. IT
m

xml | txt