OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 05, 1912, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-09-05/ed-1/seq-19/

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Ralph began to initiate him into
the pleasures of life. Among
other things, he inspired him with
a passion for motor cars. A
strange fancy in an old man but
jve- lawyers are used to these
strange streaks in human jiiature.
"They were on an automobile
tour when the accident occurred.
The car ran into a ditch some
where along the boundary be
tween two sv"Hes of the middle
west, and both men were killed.
Witnesses proved that the father
died instantly, while Ralph Brent
lived just ten minutes longer than
his father.
"That was where I came 'into
the story. For the will was so
drawn that if the father died first
all the property valued at about
six millions went to the son of
his heirs. As there were no heirs
this meant that some distant rela
tives would inherit it. If the elder
son died first the will became null
and void, and the property went
to Jack, who was then1 ranching
in California. His wife had made
him a successful man in a small
way but I wanted her to get the
money with all my heart. And
J did not want it to .go to the flock
of vultures who came out of the
uttermost parts of Massachusetts,
greedily demanding their moiety.
Yoir see, I had sought- out and
.found Mrs. Jack, and her soft
voice and gentle ways went right
into my heart, and stayed there.
And the' thing that most aston
ished me was that she did not
'seem to care whether she got the
' money or not.
"Well, the case came up for
trial. Ferdinand Quipp, the -famous
legal light, appeared for the
claimants, and the decision seem
ed inevitable. Witness after wit
ness swore .than Ralph Brent had
survived his father by several
mjnutes. J went home feeling
pretty blue the evening affer the
other side had rested hi case;
and yet, the harder I thought,
and the more hopeless our chance
seemed, the more I determined
that Mrsjjack Br.ent should get
what:6ugW4;have beerf coming
to hen.') ";
"We. had offer6(f'tocQmpr.omise
for a quarter share, and our of
fer had been most " impolitely
latfghed at. The -claitnants seem
ed sure of their case, as did
Quipp-, whp bullied Mrs. Jack unmercifully;,-
dragged out her past
into the- light, and called her a de
signing, -actress an.d.,a worthless
schemermujcVto the deliglit of
the opposing; party. .
"As Ifye. said, I went home and
thought and thought and-thought
and at last I don't knpwiwhy I
got out my big map ofcthe United
States and pored over it. Then
I got my state map and pored
over that. I had hoped to create
some effect by the point which I
had noted namely, that the two
men had died in different states.
In fact the road was the dividing
line, Ralph Brent fell into one
state and the father in an adjoin
ing one. But that didn't seem of
any particular value merely
curious.
"I dozed off in my chair and;
suddenly the significance of those
maps came to me in the middle oi
its' - j

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