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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 09, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-09-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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I I
THE DAY BOOK
JOO S. PEOI&A ST. 398 TEL. MON-ROE 353
Vol. 1, No. 298 Chicago, Monday, Sept. 9, 1912 One Cent
COWARDLY PLOT AGAINST MINERS BROUGHT
TO LIGHT BY DEATH OF MINE GUARD
-.Charleston, W. Va., Sept. 9.
A new plot of the mine owners of
West Virginia against the strik
ing miners has been uncovered.
' It is a plot equalled in baseness
only by the dynamite one planned
Jby Wm. M. Wood, head of the
Wool Trust, against the striking
textile workefs of Lawrence.
' Compelled to abolish the mine
guards they were using to drive
the miners to desperation by Ad
jutant 'General Elliott, the mine
owners were beaten.
Their mines were idle. Gov.
Glasscock had forbidden them to
import strikers. There was no
way in which they could workjthe
mines and satisfy their greedT
The striking miners, protected
from murder, assault and starva
tion by the spldiers, were able to
hold out for months. They had
- strike benefits" to live on.
, So the mine owners turned to
I Russia to find some way tQ beat
heminers into .submission and a
return to work at the old starva
tion wagfes i
From Russia, they adopted the
method, known in that country,
' as that of the "agent provoca
teur." In Russia, tne agent prococa-
teur is a spy who joins a revolu
tionary society, frames up a plot
against the government, and then
leads his comrades into a trap.
The mine owners are trying to
use that system against the min
ers, and cause the shooting of
miners by the soldiers, the stir
ring up of trouble, and a turn in
public sympathy.
Saturday, in a little village in
the hills in the Paint Creek dis
trict, a man standing in a group
of miners, suddenly drew a revol
ver and began ipumping lead at a
soldier. The' soldier shot and
killed the man.
The mine owners raised a
great cry.
"Now you see why we needed
the mine guards," they cried.
"These miners are-all murderers.
We had to have the guards or
they would have murdered us and
burned ( out our mines."
That night men in other
groups of miners fired upon the
militia at various places in the
district until marital Jaw.
The tide of public opinion,
which had been with the miners,
began to turn against them. The
citizens of Charleston who peti
tioned Gov Glasscock to abolish
the mine guard system said they
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