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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 20, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-09-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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FULL WIRE REPORTS OF THE UNITED PIESS
" "W'T-1 r
THE DAY BOOK
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500- S. PEORIA ST.
gj398
TEL. MONROE 353 i
Vol. 1, No. 308 Chicago, Friday, Sept. 20, 1912 'One Cent
MAY INVESTIGATE STATE'S ATTORNEY'S OFFICE AS
RESULT ,OF NOBLE CASE DISMISSAL
The dismissal of Carlotta No
bl&'s case against Columbus
("Jack")) Cuneo, son of the mil
lionaire fruit king, may lead to
an investigation of the state's at
torney's office.
This was the development to
day "when the charge of contempt
of court against MisS Noble's
mother was called before Judge
GemmilJ in the Court of Domes
tic Relations.
Attorney Charles E. Erbstein
appeared for the Nobles, and ask
ed that the case dismissed last
week be reopened, and that the
contempt case be continued.
Assistant State's Attorney W.
R. Fetzer, who managed to have
the case dismissed last week,
fought bitterly against any re
opening of the case.
Erbstein said there were too
many mysterious points involved
in the case to let it drop the way
it stood.
'Why," he asked, "did the as
sistant state's attorney who was
supposed to prosecute this case
so suddenly change his'front and
labor to have it dismissed?
"Was there collusion between
between this assistant state's at
torney and the family of the de
fendant? "How was ' it that .these two
women were summoned to: the
trial of their case and' not told
that their case was to be fried?
"Why were they not given an
opportunity to call any of their
witnesses, and why were they not
allowed an attorney?"
Fetzer, wlio was inxourt when
Erbstein was asking these ques
tions, did not appear to have any
adequate answer. He mumbled
something about the public good.
The case dismissed last week
was the one in which Miss Noble
charged that young Cuneo was
the father of her unborn child.
Only one witness was called, a
city physician, who before had
reported that Miss Noble was to
become a mother, but "who then
testified she was not.
Erbstein said today that he
could bring into court certificates
from half a dozen reputable phy
sicians proving that Miss Noble
was to become a mother.
Judge Gemmill refused'to re
open the case today, but gave
Erbstein until October 3 to pro
duce more evidence.
Erbstein later said flatly that
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