OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 19, 1912, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-10-19/ed-1/seq-18/

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OLD JENNINGS
By Frank Filson.
(Copyright, by W. GvGhapman.)
They called him "Old Jennings"
at the office, though he was not
much past forty. But then he
had been a bookkeeper for the
Hammer Press company for 20
years and was by far the longest
employed of all the five hundred
"But This Is a Fortune," Ex
claimed Old Jennings.
odd persons in the big building
devoted to the manufacture of
the patent printing machine.
Jennings antedated President
Bland, and the treasurer, Mul
chay and he could remember the
time when the Hammer Press
company was a small concern
operating in a tiny shop on Mas
German street.
Just as-Jennings was the oldest,
of the men, so Miss Mary Hew
lett was the oldest of women em
ployes. In a very few years peo
ple would begin to speak of her
as an old maid. Miss Hewlett
was past thirty-five. She was
the head of the card index sys
tem, and her desk was immediate
ly opposite that of Old Jennings
in the aisle down which Presi
dent Bland walked pompously to
his office three times a week and
sbmetimes four.
Old Jennings had never been
anything but a bookkeeper. He
had been bookkeeper for Van
Tuysen, the inventor of the fa
mous press, in the first days of
the company; he alqne of the old
employes had been retained when,
thirteen years previously, the lit
tle organization had been taken
over by Bland. And he was still
a bookkeeper. Then he had re
ceived fifty dollars a week. Now
he had sixty. He had had sixty
for eleven years, and he would
never get more. It was not the
policy to employ old men at the
Hammer Press company.
Van Tuysen, nad he known the
real value of the invention, might
have become a millionaire. But he
was an easy-going, credulous sort
of fellow. He had let himself be
jockeyed out of his property
had sold it almost for a song and
gone steadily down hill. He
sometimes haunted the com-f
pany's offices, a disreputable
wreck, asking for aid, especially
after his recovery from a drinking
spree. On the last occasion Bland
had told him not to return. He
never came back.
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