OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, November 04, 1912, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-11-04/ed-1/seq-19/

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"Your son has locked up his first
engagement ring for safe keep
ing, Mr. Danby.
"Eh, who's it for?" inquired
the old farmer pricking up his
ears".
"Why, whoould it be but pret
ty Nancy Burdick?" asked Jack,
flushing furiously. "I hope you
don't find any objections, father?"
"Yes, I d'6," declared the farm
er. "I object -to you not having
married her long ago. I Would,
if I'd been in your shoes. Ha,
ha!"
The old man sat at the breezy
opening in the doorway, Watch
ing the fast flying landscape with
manifest content and delight. He
had come aboard with ah old
fashioned Satchel and what seem
ed like a cardboard box about
two feet square. It was done up
in manila paper and this with his
satchel he kept close beside him.
"What you got in that box,
father?" asked Jack finally.
"Nothing to attract you, son.
You've been so long away from
the farm it wouldn't interest
you."
As it began to grow dusk the
landscape ceased to interest Mr.
jDanby. They had lunch. The
old man began to yawn.
"See here, father," said Jack,
"in the head end of the car yon
der there's acot. Dave and I spell
each other on it on the long runs
sometimes Rest a bit, won't
you?"
"I believe I will," assented the
farmer. v
The d:id-end of the car was
jc . titioned off with a door in the
middle. This Had once contained
a pane of glass to admit light, but
it was missing now. Jack soon
heard his father snoring. He and
his mate were sorting some second-class
express matter about
an hour later when a crash arous
ed them.
In went the panel of the plat
form door. The end of a crow
bar intruded. Then, before the
startled express messengers
could advance or retreat, a quick
hand reached in, snapped the
catch, and as the shattered door
swung inwards two men sprang
into view.
"Hands up I" ordered one of
them, and the trainmen found
themselves threatened with two
glittering revolvers.
Resistance meant sure death,
and Jack and Dave were forced
to succumb to being bound hand
and foot. The men carried them
to the doorway of the dead end,
threw them upon the floor, and
proceeded to assault the steel
safe. One of them faced the pris
on place of their captives, Wea
pon leveled.
His companion must have been
working some fifteen minutes on
the stubborn strong box, when
the old farmer awoke.
"Father," spoke Jack quickly,
"don't stir, don't raise your voice
above a whisp"er."
"Why not?" inquired the old
man.
"Train robbers !" anneunced
Dave in acautious voiGe.
"You don't say so where?"
demanded the farmer.
"Out in the other part of the

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