OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 31, 1912, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-12-31/ed-1/seq-20/

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there since their marriage. She
knew that he had a bookkeeper,
a stenographer and an office
boy. When she went in she saw
the same office boy and book
keeper; but there was a new ste
nographer, a little, fluffy-haired
thing, who chewed gum brazenly.
Her heart sank. Was it possible
that John was attracted by that
creature ?
"Why, Mary !" John was at the
door, looking at her with a puz
zled expression. He was holding
her hands. "Mary! What is
wrong, dear?"
She could not help her tears.
"Send that woman away' she
said in a faltering voice, and the
stenographer withdrew softly,
smiling a little. She had seen
men's wives go to their husbands'
offices before. Mary Benton en
tered, put down her bag -and,
standing like a recording angel,
flung down the letter silently.
John Benton read it and suddenly
began to laugh uproariously.
"John ! You are laughing !" ex
claimed his wife.
"Read it aloud, my dear," her
husband answered. "So you
thought you thought "
"John, what do you mean ? Can
you offer any excuse at all? What
is it?"
John Benton read solemnly:
"My Dearest, Sweetest Jack
When are you going to take me
out to dinner again, as you did on
the 29th, sweetheart? I miss you
every hour of the day more
than I miss Hairoff, the new pat
ent scissors for cutting your own
hair. When I see my brother's
Hairoff I think of your own dark,
lustrous locks. I "
"Oh, pshaw F said John, throw1
ing the letter down. "That's a
mimeographed circular, Mary;
we're flooding the country with
them. Everybody will read them
and want a pair. Look at those
stacks of letters up there, dearest
they're all the same letter, all
those thousand of them. And you
thought you really thpught "
But Mary was past thinking
now. She was in his arms and her
tears were those of relief, happi
ness and humiliation.
Stewed Apples.
Sometimes the only apple
available is half ripe and rather
insipid. In such a case it is pos
sible to add to the flavor by em
ploying a half cup or more of
stoned, slictd dates and adding to
each quart of partially stewed ap
ples. Simmer the fruit together
for -about 6 minutes and set asWe
to cool. The grated rind of a
lemon, or the juice of a lemon,
placed with the aj)ples when first
put on, varies the flavor also.
One of the suffragettes march
ing on Albany has won a Pough
keepsie reporter and is going to
marry him. Onward Christian
Suffragettes ! There are too many
unmarried reporters running
around.
Mrs. Long Do you remember
that I gave you no decided tfnsweY
the first time you proposed'?
Long I remember that you sus
pended sentence.
MiimiiMarifiiiTiiil
gHaffi

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