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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 09, 1913, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-01-09/ed-1/seq-18/

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RENSLEY'S RETURN
By George Munson.
All London society was whis
pering and questioning, for Lord
Rensley was on his way home to
England after an absence of a
year. He had &hot tigers in In
dia, had speared, salmon in Alas
ka, and hunted grizzlies in the
wilds of western Canada. And
Drew Back With a Frightened
Catch of the Breath.
all the while Lady Rensley had
kept open house at the Abbey.
'Now he was expected home; he
would arrive in two weeks. Ac
tually he arrived a week earlier
and unexpectedly.
5 They had been married nearly
three years before. Lady Rens
ley had been Miss Edith Kane, of
Cleveland, and her father was
one of the twelve richest men in
America. The marriage had been
considered singularly fortunate,
for the Rensley family dated
back five hundred years though
not the title, and his lands were
extensive, although unprofitable.
Miss Kane's dowry would restore
the old abbey and enable her hus
band and herself to assume their
rightful place in the social hier
archy. And so Rensley had won
the beauty of Cleveland.
This is what happened three
hours after the marriage: He and
his bride were face to face in their
apartments at the Eversley hotek
The bride drew off her engage
ment ring meditatively and hand
ed it to him and said, without a
trace of passion:
"I shall wear my marriage ring,
but not this. The bargain is 'an
equal one and I am satisfied. You
will never have cause to be
ashamed of me in the eyes of the
world. Goodnight, Lord Rens
ley." "You mean," he asked, "that
our marriage is to be one in name
only?"
"Why, what else did you ex
pect?" she answered mockingly,
though her lips were quivering.
"You never loved me. You sought
me for my fortune, as I you for
your title." And so she turned
away and they said no more.
That he had sincerely loved her
she did not know, nor he that she
could have caed for him had not
the marriage been made by her
ambitious mother. In due course
they sailed for England. Rensley

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