OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 08, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-02-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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THIS ISN'T AN ADVERTISING HANDBILL; ITS
GOT NOTHING BUT REAL NEWS IN IT
THE DAY BOOK
500 SO. PEORIA ST.
398
TEL. MONROE 353
VOL.2,NQ.112 Chicago, Saturday, Feb. 8, 1913 ONE CENT
CITY BUILDINQ DEPARTMENT IN IGNORANCE
OF DANGEROUS VIOLATIONS OF LAW
Human Lives Sacrificed to Ericsson's Careless "Don't
Know Anything About It" Coroner Helps
Keep Truth From Public.
The most amazing conditions
exist in the city building depart
ment today, conditions which no
one in authority seems to give a
hoot about.
Conditions, too, which, when
they lead to loss of human life,
are carefully suppressed at cor
oner's inquests.
John J. Lusch, a workman in
the prime of life, was killed by a
fell from an elevator in the Car
son, Pirie, Scott & Co. store last
Thursday.
At the inquest over Lusch's
body conducted by Deputy Cor
oner Adolph Herrmann, the fol
lowing facts were sworn to:
That there was a space of two
feet between the edge of the ele
vator flooring and the basement
platforms; a space of two feet
over whi$h everyone entering or
leaving the elevator had to step, a
space wide enough for a human
body to fall through.
That the chain guard in front
of the elevator from which Lusch
fell was only four feet high.
The Day Book went to the
building department to find out
how such conditions, endanger
ing human life, were permitted.
The information desk of the
building department referred the
reported to one Hoy, secretary to
Building Commissioner Ericsson.
Hoy was asked if there were any
city regulations requiring that
elevators should run flush with
all four sides of the shaft.
"I can't tell you about that,"
said Hoy. "I'm not posted on
that point. I'll take you to a man
who can tell you all about it.-'
Hoy led the reporter to J. B.
Taylor, chief elevator clerk, a
gentleman who modestly admit
ted that he had ''read the city
building laws through about 500
times."
Taylor did not at first answer
the question as to what city regu
lation there might be. He said;

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