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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 15, 1913, NOON EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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noon Wtion;.A i ;r5"Vr-k in'oon-edition
MEN TAKE N&TIcij, 'THE&EfS ANARTICLE IN
TODAYS fABEHASOKGinirQNLY (
THE
N. D. Cochran,
Editor and Publisher.
DAY BOOK
oiii 398
500 South Peoria St.
.Tel., Monroe. 353.
VOL.2..N0.142 Chicago, Saturday, March 15, 1913
ONE CENT
DEPARTMENT" STORE GIRLS DEMAND CHANCE
TO FIGHT THEIR OWN BATTLES
Women Whose Organization Millionaires Have Pre
vented Demand Right to Unity at First, Mass
Meeting Since O'Hara Revelations.
WHEREAS, The evidence given during the past two weeks
beforethe senate committee" of Illinois, investigating white slavery
and its causes, has strikingly emphasized . low wages as- the
greatest single cause of vice; '
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That this-meeting respect
fully urge the clergymen of'Chicago and vicinity of ll denomina
tions to make, on Palm Sunday (being the last Sunday in Lent), an,
appeal to their congregations asking them to support a minimum
wage law for women and also to encourage the organization of
women as an indispensable means -of raising their industrial
standard. The cry of the working women of Chicago to the
churches.
There never was;a moresignificant
meeting held in, Chicago, than that of
the underpaid working women held
last nightin Musicians' hall, 175 West
Washington street-
"And it wasn't so much because "of
any one thing that was said at the
meeting. It'was because of the spirit
of the women who listened.
The meeting was called a mass
meeting. But it had been arranged
on a few days' notice, and the big de
partment store and factory' owners
had fought any spreading of the news
of the meeting among th'eir em
ployes' viciously.
- Jet long "before' the'hour .set for the
first speaking; Musicians' hall was
crowded to the doors with women
workers.
Young girls, mere children, with
fresh dbmplexions and shining eyes;,
old women, bowed with toil, their
eyes dulled with the long years of it;
small women' and big women; well
dressed women and shabby women.
But all of them with the same look
on their, faces-a look of weariness,
vith hope and the sense of their own
chance to fight for theirtselves, shin
ing through it.
And the meeting was not what
anyone expected.
It had been thought the women

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