OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 09, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-04-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

BLACKFEET BRAVES SING INTO. TALKING
MACHINES-INDIAN SONGS WILL NEVER DIE
THE DAY BOOK
An.Adless Daily Newspaper.
N. D. Cochran; gigBga 500 South Peoria St.
Editor' and: Pnblisher. TeL Monroe 353.
V0L:2, IStd:i63 Chicago, Wednesday, April 9, 1913 ONE CENT
RUTH HANNA McCORMlCK FAINTS WHEN
SCORING TRUST PRESS TO STORE GIRLS
Daughter of Millionaire Maker of Presidents Recently
Became a Mother, But Risked' Illness to tlelp
Sisters' Fight for Living Wage.
Ruth Hanna McCormick, daughter of the late millionaire manufac
turer and. wife of 'Medill, McCormick, "himself zt millionaire, last night pub
licly denounced .the trust newspapers of Chicago. ,
SPie.'did so in addressing a mass meeting of department store, girls held
in Musicians' Hall,' 175 West Washington street.
i. She declared that she knew it was impossible to get the news of the
struggie.oftihe department store, girls for a living wage and decent working
conditions into. the newspapers because they were controlled by the big
State street advertisers.. -
Immediately, after her .denunciation of the, newspapers, Mrs. .McCor
mick -fell into . a, dead faint. She had to" be'carriedV'from the hall to thei
street, where physicians worked over" her for-. twenty minutes before they
could reviveJier. 1 ' , , " ,
'Five. weeksago' Mrs McCormick became,-a. mother. -Shesuffered a
great deal: 'She still is very weak. .
When sfre announced to her friends that -she ?was going'to .speak at
the meeting, last 'night they tried to persuade her not to. They tojd her
that. sh,e was not physically fit to do so.
- But Mrs.. McCormick said that she felt that the. department store girls
were fighting against, great oddsand that it was herduty 'to do what little
she. could to help them. - 1
Several other speakers 'had gohe before Mrs. McCormick. The room
was close rid stuffy when she arose to speak; She looked .around at the
50p odd' girls who had dared the' vengeance of the State street millionaires
tov attend the meeting.
"I came here," she" said, "to express my very great sympathy for you,
arid to' tell you that I am very much in earnest' when I say that I want to
help you to organize for your-own -.againpt oman has been that all
protection, in every Dosslble. way. ' jvomen are individualists.
"The 'greatest argument of man "We HAD to be individualists for,

xml | txt