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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 10, 1913, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-04-10/ed-1/seq-8/

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Years spenl in swinging a hammer
gave the blacksmith his powerful
looking biceps. For his work just
such an, arm is neefled, maximum
amount of work with the minimum of
fatigue.
The trainer of boxers, sprinters,
jumpers, football or baseball players
seek to develop such muscles. The
pitching arm shown belongs to Bob
Harmon. He has the biggest arm of
the St. Louis Cardinal pitchers. His
muscles are soft and spongy, and the
powerful searching -fingers of the
trainer sink deep into the flesh as he
massages the pitching wing, of the
Card hurler. They would scarcely
make an impression on the arm of
the blacksmith. -
ANOTHER DEADLY BLOW AT THE
r DEMON RUM
Some of our legislative (once in a
while) gents up at' Springfield are
about due to step on a banana skin
and find out what happens under the
circumstances.
Yesterday some duly outraged gink
introduced a bill to prevent the horrid
drinking of the horrid mini students.
One clause of this bill reads: "No
saloon shall be operated or liquor
gold within four miles of any building-,
grounds or campus owned by the
state and' which forms part of a state
university."
Pine, you say! Soak-it to the
students ; they oughtn't to drink any
how, and who cares what, happens
out at Champaign?
No one, no one at all.
But did it ever occur to you that
the College -of Physicians and Sur
geons is part of the University of
Illinois, and that said college is sit
uated at West Congress and Honore
streets, less than two miles from
State and Madison streets?
That's different, isrt it?
If that legislative guy gets his bill
passed, every saloon in the loop and
about half the saloons in au-cnicago
si laUili
SAY MILITIA INVITES TROUBLE
INSTEAD OF QUELLING IT
Bulletin.
Buffalo, N. Y., April 10. Troops
charged a mob of 100 strikers and
sympathizers that stoned a car in
front of No. 6 police station this
afternoon. Several shots were fire'd,
but no one was seriously injured.
Buffalo, N. Y., April for Brigadier
General Welch, commanding the 2,
700 troops guarding the property of
the street car company, today tele
graphed to Albany tha,t if troops are
to be used at all, he should be given
more men.
City officials and prominent- citi
zens do not want the troops already
in the city and sent telegrams of pro
test to Governor Sulzer. If the troops
were not here, according to one offi
cial, there would be no violence. .It
was Intimated that the militia incited
disturbances, rather than quelling
them.
' The attitude of city officials appar
ently makes no difference to Welch,
who is doing every thing in his power
to assist the car company.
Several riots followed Welch's or
der to shoot any man seen picking
up a stone. One woman was mortally
injured and half a dozen boys and
men were seriously wounded by the
troops.
A counter proposition from the car
company, providing reinstatement
without recognition of the union, was
being considered by the strikers this
afternoon, with small chance of ac
ceptance. .
Prospects of a general strike of 42,
000 Buffalo union m"en were threaten
ing this afternoon. The executive
council of the central union has call
ed a special meeting to recommend
such a strike unless the car company
comes to terms with its eniployes
Saturday night may be set as the
time limit for such an agreement, at
WhJVh Hmo a.frpnfvral sjtrikfi wmilrl ho
called .'for Syda 9iy loogxsg

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