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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 18, 1913, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-04-18/ed-1/seq-13/

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By Gertrude Mary Sheridan.
Bessie -Thurston had two'lovers,
and therefore two rivals, practically
enemies.1 It1ia'd.come about through
a rude dis'turbihginfluence in a clear
field for Rodney- Thprne. ;He had
fondly, considered Bessie,his own un
til Willis Gould appeared upon the
scene. Given; a bewitching young
lady and a newcomer, the latter good-
Clinging to Either Side ofjthe Craft.
looking, withsuperior prospects, and
feted and petted by all the other
young ladles. in, the. town,. and natur
ally all that was vivacious in Bessie's
naturelwas aroused.
Gould was "a jackanapes,'.' accord
ing to Rx)dney!s.prejudi'ced.ideas. He
was the scion of a -wealthy family,
had never worked a" day . in his life,
and was shortly-to go abroad as sec
retary of a consulate. This gave
Gould "high .diplomatic ideas,'.', and
the apparent right- ,to. wear' a semi-
mintary-coat wicn two gut Buttons
on the neckband, which some of his
gMadmirers' designated as "too cute
for anything!" '.
"It's got tp come to an end," said
Rodney, definitely, one balmy even
ing. "And now's my chance, to end.
it," he added, as he reached the
Thurston home to find Bessie-alone
in the garden.
If Rodney' had appeared as the.
placid, contented suitor, of ante
Gould days he might have won his
way. He made the jealous lover's
mistake, however, of. preluding his
suit with his own peculiar ideas of
his rival. Then he ridiculed and cen
sured Bessie's indulgence for "the
spoiled society pet," as her denominat
ed. Gould.'
"I won't hear a word against my
friends!" declared the aroused Bes
sie. . . " .
"A fine .friend for nobodyto claim,
that jackanapes!" snapped out the ir
ritated Rodney.
"I think .we had better meet later,
when, you are more rational,')' sug
gested Bessie.
"No, you shall hear me-now;" de
clared; Rodney, determinedly, choos
ing the very worst, moment to .appeal
to an offended deity, and puttinghiB
plea more in the form of "a complaint
than a true and tender confession,qf
love.
He managed to get .hold of her
hand, and she was. more than inter
ested. A proposal of marriage was d
serious, solemn thing'to Bessie. Just
then some girl friends came into the
garden. She feared ridicule and dre,w
her hand away. Rodney's brow
darkened.
"I must have my4 answer yes 'or
no?" he persevered.' : "'
"Later in the evening."
At th'aTmoment Gould came saun;
tering up the walk-. ' t
"No-'now!"
"Then n6!" :
Rejected! Rodney was" positively
rude as lie .brushed by the new
,cbmersr' He made no allowance for
his 'own faulty impetuosity. ' He had

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