OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 05, 1913, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-05-05/ed-1/seq-19/

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"DON'T BE AFRAID OF A PC'ICEMAN, GIRLS
AND BOYS," SAYS POLICE CLASS TEACHER
Suppose your older daughter, IwH
her early 'teens, is annoyed by a maniu
on the street. &
She is frightened; but she does not
call the passing officer. Somehow, iti
does not occur to her. q
"I should like to talk to all thfejs
children of all the cities in America," o
says Mrs. Gertrude Howe Britton,
who has .spent years in helping boys $
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Mrs. Gertrude. Britton and a class of Chicago policemen.
Suppose your little boy gets Tost
in the city streets.
Along comes a policeman, and the
boy runs, away from him and hides
in an alley.
He's AFRATD of a policeman.
Suppose your little girl has to cross
a crowded street alone.
She" lingers, terror-stricken at-the
curb, or dodges between cars, Wag
ons and automobiles at perjl of her
life.
There is a policeman there but
shells AFRAID of him.
I
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and girls, at Hull House and as head
of the Chicago Juvenile Protective j
Association. I would say to them: -,
" 'Don't be afraid of a policeman!9
'"The policeman is your friend.
The city pays him to take care of
YOU. .
" 'If yoer get lost, go to him, and9
he will help you find yourjway home.
If you are afraid to cross the street 0
alone, he win help you over. If rough
boys or grown people bother you, run
to the policeman for protection.
THAT is what he is FOR.'
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"And then," says Mrs. Britton, "I'd 3

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