OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 12, 1913, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-05-12/ed-1/seq-12/

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In support of this, Cantillon raided
the old folks' home when he organ
ized the Minneapolis baseball club
and won the .pennant last year and
the year before in. the American As
sociation. The only man the Millers (English
for Minneapolis) lost in the draft last
fall was Otis C3ymer,aged 34, who
was suspected by the other players of
having cholera infantum every time
he had a pain, because of his extreme
youth.
Cantillon spends more time train
ing his collection of .sires and grand
sires every spring than any other A.
A; magnate, because they need more
time to get the rheumatism out of
their brittle joints, than clubs which
carry an assortment of younger
players.
At Hickman, Ky., where the Millers
train and where Cantillon and Rube
Waddell hibernate in the winter, the
natives say that the noises about the
camp during the first few days, as
the dried hinges are painfully unlim
bered, remind the farmers for miles
around that it is time to grease the
wagon wheels.
The Minneapolis team, under Can
tillon, is a refuge for. infirm ball play
ers, but many consider Cantillon con
siderable of a fo, arguing that he is
caring for the grandfathers now to
have rst claim to the grandchildren
who will be ball players in a few
years.
Cantillon jollies his old men along
in the winter by taking them hunting
and fishing in the Reefioot lake coun
try. Perry Werden accompanied him
once as guest of honor, and some one
took a long distance shot at Perry,
prpbably to ascertain whether years
as an umpire had toughened the vet
eran's hide to bird shot. Rumor saith
Perry is. still considered a good pros
pect by lead miners.
o o
"How shall we stop the great evil
of lying?" asks a religious weekly.
Give it up. It's a habit you ought
never te have fallen into.
EEACHEY TO QUIT FLYINGFOR
BENEFIT OF OTHER AVfATORS
San Francisco, Cal., May 12. Lin
coln Beachey, the "dare devil of the
air," is through with the flying game,
he announced today.
Beachey is not afraid for' himself-,
but he believes too many aviators
attempt to imitate his hair-Taising
stunts and are killed.
'Tm done,'1 he said. "You couldn't
make me enter another -aeroplane af
the "point of a gun."
Beachey carries a card on which
he has. tbenames of noted aviator
friends who" have met their death.
Thelist is a long one.
"They called me the master bird- '
man," Baid Beachey. "The crowd ap
plauded my spirals, but what .they
paid their money for was to see me
plunge to my death The others exe
cuted spirals because I did and they
had to do it -to- earn money. The
crowd. Ranted thrills. The fact that
the aviator life was endangered
made no difference.
"Poor Welsh, told his wife he had
to jio the spirals 'because Beachey
does them, if he wanted to get, the
money.
"I met Mrs. Walsh and her two
fatherless babies at Albuquerque
when she was returning with the
brave boy's tody. She became hyster
ical when Bhe'saw me. - -
" Ton made him dolt,' she said.
"It was the same "way with the
wife of Eugene Ely. v
" "Eugene would be with me now
if he had never, seen, you fly,' she
wrote mef
"I felt I had murdered those two
boys. The responsibility is too much
The crowds demand that I give- them
spirals. If I do other aviators will
follow me. The only thing for me
to do 4s to quit,"
q o
Up to 1892, Uncle Sam had given
over 56 million acres of land to pro
jected railways. No wonder that such
successful beggars got the notion
that they were -bosseSt
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