OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 12, 1913, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-05-12/ed-1/seq-20/

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a
seven stories below, and his shriian
partner in discord was climbing the
fire escape in quest of pennies.
Marie's wail, so goes the story, was
timed to coincide with the last de
spairing gasp of the hurdy gurdy as
it finished the chorus of "Down Went
McGInty!" And Marie's proud and
happy father declared, with a twinkle
fn his eye, that he distinctly heard
the new-born utter the last line of
the verse:
"Dressed in his best suit of
clothes!"
Be that as it may, if any one had
suggested to Marie's father, mother,
sisters and brothers that she would
one day be a great prima donna, they
would have greeted the suggestion
with loud guffaws of mirthful unbe
lief. At an early age Miss Cavan entered
upon a business career in a broker's
office as a stenog. Her pay was $5
a week, and she carried her lunch in
a phoney music roll. She did not,
however, chew gum.
She had never heard any good mu
sic. She heard the rumbling crash
and roar of the elevated trains. She
heard the wheezing, gasping hurdy
gurdies. She heard squalling babies,
peevish women, angry men, wheels
on cobblestones, clicking typewriters,
the curt voice of her bald-headed em
ployer giving dictation, but she never
heard any good music.
Then came the turning point in
her life. She visited the opera for the
first time in her life.
It cost her a lot of money to see
the opera. She went on short rations
for a week to accomplish it The
gallery seat cost one large dollar. It
was "Tannhauser" big, booming
"Tannhauser."
Then one evening she announced
to the assembled Cavans: "I am go
ing to take singing lessons."
If you can imagine how you would
feel if your own daughter were to
announce casually: "I'm going to
join the harem of the Sultan of Zan
zibar," ox iTmjjDingrto buy a balloon
and go to. the moon," you have soma
idea of how Father and Mother
Cavan and all the little Cavans felt
when Marie said she was going to
take singing lessons.
She did, too. By and by Marie gave
a recital. A bunch of swagger folks
were there. Marie nearly died with
fright, but she didn't show it, and she
sang marvelously. And she made a
small chunk of money, enough, may
be, to
Go abroad!
' She went. She made that small
chunk of money go a long way. And
the Cavans at home, having recov
ered from their astonishment, had
faith, and they helped all they could.
And by pinching and scrimping and
struggling, the musical education
was completed.
Then Dippel heard her sing in Ger
many three years ago, and he beam
ed all over his face. And Mary Gar
den heard her sing, and she kissed
the ex-stenog. And Dippel prepared
a document, full of legal phrases,
which he signed; then Marie sign
ed it.
Now she rides around in a special
train, and has a maid, and a secretary
of her own, and occupies luxurious
suites in expensive hotels, and she
gets an awful pile of money, just for
singing.
TAKEN ON
(r the:
JguyJ
"I want a job," said he to the sausage
maker. "Gee!
For I'm out of work, which really
is distressin',
And you need not be afraid that I
don't know the trade;
I'm the guy that put the cat in
delicatessen."
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