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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 13, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-05-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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GIRLS! LET FATE FRET ABOUT YOUR MAN;'
YOU SHOULD WORRY; STORY INSIDE
THE DAY BOOK
N. D. Cochran,
Editor and Publisher.
500 South Feoria St.
' TeL Monroe 353.
VOL. 2, NO. 192 Chicago, Tuesday, May 13, 1913
ONE CENT
lVICE AND CRIME IN CHICAGO ABOUT TO BE
USED AGAIN AS A POLITICAL PUNCHING BAG
Having Killed Vice and Crime Deader Than a Salt
Mackerel Last Year, the Newspapers and Politicians
Are Now Getting Ready to Kill 'Em All Over Again.
A
BY N. D. COCHRAN
Chicago is now being entertained by another crusade against crime .
which means that the politicians are getting ready for the next election.
Every city has these periodical crusades against vice and crime and;
after theTvave of morality has swept on, the surface of things looks cleaner
for a while. Shortly afterward the people go to the polls and vote, some
body is elected mayor and then life goes on much as it did before the
crusade.
It's human nature and politics. And one of our favorite outdoor
sports is reforming the other fellow. We certainly do like to tell our neigh
bor what to do and how to live. And we certainly DON'T like to have him,
take the same interest in us and meddle in our private affairs.
I don't know just for whose special entertainment these governmental
farces are staged. Of course, the purpose is to fool somebody but I don't;
know who is being fooled just now. Not many, however. I guess we al
understand the game fairly well.
We rail at the police, of course. But most of us know that the aver
age policeman1 will obeyorders; and that any police force will be what the
mayor makes it
It wasn't two years ago that we had a rattling of drybones in the police
department with Harmon Campbell, Andy Lawrence's business manager
of Hearst's Examiner, in charge as president of the Civil Service Commis
sion. Various police officersAvere -called before the commission, and asked if
vice existed in heir districts. And most of them said no of course. Not
knowing exactly what they were expected to say, they said the thing police
men are usually expected to say. v
Then came the commission's private investigators with information
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