OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 20, 1913, Image 15

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-05-20/ed-1/seq-15/

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THE LOAD THE SCHOOL BOY CARRIES ' v
O 0
EQUALITY OF DRESS TO SAVE SCHOOL GIRL&
HEARTACHES
Did your little girl ever come home from school crying because some of
ie other girls were dressed better than she and made fun of her for being
loor or old-fashioned?
Boys as a rule don't notice such things unless to show their contempt
tor the mamma's boy who is overdolled. But girls are different. It doesn't
ieem to come natural for them to be democratic. Each girl is an equation
y herself. The long centuries during which women have been kept more
or less secluded from contact with affairs have developed an aptness for
personal appraisal which sometimes verges close to snippiness.
Hence it is that the problem of a girl's dress while going to school is
much more than a mere problem of finding something to cover her naked-
ness. It rises to the dignity of a social function. It tends to establish
her entire status in life.
In Fort Wayne, Ind., a group of unusual mothers have formed a club
to see if they can do anything to lighten the lot of the school girls whose
dresses aren t as fine and costly as the best
They are going to try and persuade the mothers of all the girls in the
public schools, to adopt a uniform dress for their daughters of inexpensive
material, so that there shall be no further feeling of inequality.
It will be fine if this can be done, for it will help to take out of the
public school the one thing which now hinders it from being thoroughly
democratic
It is good to have mothers thinking about such things, for it shoW3
that the leaven of democracy is at work where Jeast expected,

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