OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 05, 1913, NOON EDITION, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-07-05/ed-1/seq-9/

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SEVEN DOLLARS' CHANGE A WEEK OR A
CHANGE OF MIND FOR WILLIAM
BY JANE WHITAKER
Furniture on the installment plan that and the fact that a bartender
can drink more than his wife thinks he should was the cause of a separa
tion and maintenance suit by Mrs.. Louise Knaak against William Knaak.
William is, and has been for a nir.uber of years, a bartender. Louise
claims that one saloon where he termed bar went into bankruptcy, but
William says he is not responsible for this. '
Louise and William, lured by the advertisements of let-us-furnish-your-dove-nest-at-so-much-a-week,
thought matrimony was an easy thing on a
$14 salary, so they bought $259 worth of furniture and started in to be
happy.
The first fly in the ointment was that William, according to Louise,
stayed out too late at night and he was always intoxicated, but the worst
. thing was that he didn t give her ,
enough money to keep up the in
stallment payments, and the "gentle
men collectors" were real sassy to
her.
She claims she told William of this,
but he did not resent it in fact, he
showed an absolute indifference. So,
after she had paid $52 on the bill and
was in arrears, and the company told
her they would take the furniture
away, she lost heart and moved her
owh possessions out, leaving William
minus a home.
The stories do not quite agree
about this. William, who has become
a vindictive cuss, says that Louise de
liberately called up that nice furni
ture house that wouldn't have mind
ed their being in arrears at all, and
told them to take back their old fur
niture, as she was going to leave the
place. And William is sure he never
knew they were in arrears.
In the three years the husband and
wife have been "separated, William
has never gone to the home of his
wife's mother to see his little baby
girl.
He says this is -because Mrs.
Krause, his mother-in-law, threaten
ed to spit in 'his face. But Mrs.
Krause says this is a gross libel, and
she grew quite excited over it.
And another discrepancy Louise
contends that Williams had the nasty
habit many husbands employ of
banding a wife fifty cents, one day,
a dollar another, and so forth, and
asking her what she did with the
quarter he let her have last week.
William says that far from this,
he gave her all of his $14 every Sat
urday with the exception of one sin
gle dollar that he kept for himself,
and, being a bartender, and the
drinks on the house, well
William really had grown real
nasty. He told the judge that Louise
left him because she said she was
born for a good time and wouldn't
spend her life looking at four walls,
and when the judge impatiently re
minded him that Louise, young, pret
ty, -clever, is out working by the day,
living at home with her mother and
having her mother "mind the baby
girl, William wouldn't retract a sin
gle step, but even grew a little more
spiteful.
Judge TuthDl gave him a talking
to. He advised him to furnish a home
again, even if it were only three
rooms and take his pretty little wife
and his little daughter home and
make them happy.
But William said it would be im
possible to forget the past he was
sure when they were sitting at the
table it would rise to confront them
"You are an intelligent looking
man," pursued the judge relentlessly,
"and I am surprised that you should
come into this court and tell such a
story about your wife. I do not be-

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