OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 17, 1913, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-07-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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to do with it! The Day Book had
better be careful! I won't talk to "
And Chicago's indictment attorney,
the gentleman who "handles" the
grand juries, reached his private of
fice, shot inside, and slammed the
door viciously.
o o
CRISPELL MURDER TO REMAIN
MYSTERY JOHNS RELEASED
Wilkesbarre, Pa., July 17. Her
bert Johns, who was charged with
the murder of Alice Crispell, found
drowned in Harveys Lake, July 7,
was released by Judge H. A. Fuller
because of insufficient evidence to
connect him with the case.
Johns was the acknowledged lover
of the girl and was the last person
seen with her on the night of the
Fourth of July. Three days later her
body was found in the lake.
Johns denied all knowledge of how
the girl lost her life and was exon
erated by the coroner's jury. The
following night, however, he was
given a hearing by a justice of the
peace, who held Johns without bail
to await the action of the grand jury.
The girl's father pitifully told of
her taste of cafe life which had seem
ed to change the girl.
"She was not bad," he said, brok
enly, "just wilful and weak. She had
never been in a city larger than Wil-.
kesbarre, and New York was to her
like a dream. I notice the change
that came over her after she remark
ed one night last spring that she
would love to see Broadway and the
lights.
"She had visited the cafes in Wil
kesbarre and it had opened her eyes
to a world apart from that in which
she was born and reared. The call
of the white lights had reached her.
"Yes, she became different. She
used to stay out late at night and
sometimes she didn't come home at
all.
"One night, when she had been
away twenty-four hours, I tried to
talk to her, but she listened indiffer
ently. I took my gun from the shelf ,
and pointed it at her. 'It would bfr
better that the bullet in this gun
should pierce your heart than that
you should sell your soul to the devil,'
I told her.
"I did not threaten to shoot Mur
der was not in my heart and the gun
was not loaded, but I was trying to
impress the value of her life and soul
upon her.
"Every night since her body was
found I pray for the soul of my little
girl," he finished. "I believe God has
taken her to His side where the wick
ed cease from troubling and the
weary are at rest."
The mystery will probably never
be solved. Every clue has been ex
hausted and the police are utterly at
sea. That it was a murder they are
confident, but there is no concrete
evidence as to how Miss Crispell got
into the lake where death was caused
by drowning.
Johns, released after nine days in
jail, says he believes the girl was
murdered, but is at a loss to say by
whom or why.
He says he is "going to give up
the white lights and join a church,"
and seemed much more concerned
over his own future than about the
death of his sweetheart.
o o
DISSECTORS GET BODY
Medical dissectors today won a
four-day fight for the body of Mrs.
Mary Schultz, who drank carbolic
acid two hours after the body of her
daughter, Mary, was dragged from
the lake.
Neighbors of the two women, who
lived at 37 S. Halsted street, raised
money to pay for the burial of the
girl, but refused to interest them
selves in the mother.-
o o :
"What kind of a career have you
mapped out for your boy, Josh?"
"I'm going to make a lawyer of him,"
answered Farmer Wheatley. "He's
got an unconquerable fancy for
'tendin' to other folks' business, an'
he might as well git paid for it"

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