OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 27, 1913, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-08-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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culatloa and advertising, and the peo
ple have been finding out things they
didn t know before.
The complete exposure of the pol
icy of hiring gunmen and sluggers to
fight the battles of-the publishers has
forced them to let up on that lawless
game, and they no longer can get
away, with the play of having slug
gers make newsboys "eat" papers.
In fact, The Day Book has been
the most powerful influence for good
ever known in Chicago journalism,
and is already revolutionizing the
newspaper business. People are find
ing out that there is one NEWSpaper
in town that isn t afraid to print any
news that is true news and of public
interest.
And the more truth The Day Book
prints, the more the other news
papers have to print; because if they
don't print it their readers find it out
through The Day Book and know the
big newspapers are cheating them in
not giving them the news.
One of the greatest journalists in
this country, who has been watching
The Day Book closely since it started,
recently said in a letter that he con
sidered the Chicago Day Book the
most important social movement in
the world today, and the most im
portant since the time of Luther.
And even if the rumors about the
Tribune-News-Record-Herald deal
prove to be unfounded, there is bound
to be some such upheaval in Chicago
journalism soon, and all newspapers
will have to print the truth and rep
resent their readers instead of their
advertisers.
The Day Book will give some inter
esting particulars about Bent's war
on the Tribune among advertisers
later. It looks like an attempt to
force the Tribune to knuckle down to
Big Business and obey the orders of
advertisers.
One "thing about the rumored deal
that doesn't sound quite reasonable
is the price given that is to be paid
for the News. It is said to make a
profit of nearly a million a year, and
if that is so $6,000,000 would be a
low price for it. But, then, Victor
Lawson Is getting old, and may want
to lay down the burden.
o o
CARPENTERS PASS RESOLUTION
The following resolutions were
adopted by Carpenters' Local Union
No. 1784:
Wheeras, The owners and publish
ers of the Chicago Examiner and
Chicago American have proven by
their attitude in the circumstances
leading to and in the strike of the
Chicago newspaper trades their ha
tred of union labor, and
Whereas, The aforesaid publishers
are about to issue a so-called labor
edition of one of their papers, organ
ized labor being solicited to assist in
the editing of such an issue; there
fore be it
Resolved, That Local 1784, United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join
ers of America, in regular meeting
assembled, consider any such solici
tation on the part of the publishers
an effort to regain their lost circu
lation and increase their advertising
revenue; and be it further
Resolved, That in view of the fore
going facts, the officers and members
of this union refrain from having
'anything whatsoever to do with the
Chicago Examiner or the American
representatives; and be it further
Resolved, That this union protest
the assistance of any individual or
representative of the organized labor
movement in the issuance of the so
called Hearst Labor Edition; and be
it further
Resolved, That a copy of these
resolutions be forwarded to the Chi
cago Federation of Labor, the Daily
Press, The Arbeiter Zeihmg and The
Day Book.
o o
Patten of Chicago has a corner in
corn. Snyder of Chicago has a cor
ner in molasses.
It's a direct attack on one of the
fundamentals of constitutional gov
ernment johnnybread.

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