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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 15, 1913, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-09-15/ed-1/seq-10/

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So he fills the minds of his, pupils
with various ideas and makes them
express those ideas in bodily move
ments. Rhythm is one of the chief
studies. Most of the girls in the
school, as they-dance, can beat two
step time with one-arm, and waltz
time with the other, move the head
to schottische time, and simul
taneously dance a polka.
As you see a hundred girls perform
one of these complicated dances, you
forget their extraordinary attires.
. "The attire these girls wear has
naturally grown out of their dances,"
Jacques-Dalcroze tells you.
''First I began with bloomers, worn
under skirts. The idea of our school
is physical liberty, and when some of
the girls began to leave off their
skirts, I made no objection to their
dancing in bloomers. Then some of
them found that they could dance
better in bare feet, and they began
to leave off their stockings. The
bloomers gradually became smaller
and smaller until they disappeared,
and the girls themselves, without any
advice or direction from the chiefs
of the school, finally adopted the
tricot.
"In doing this they have not lost
one bit of their modesty, but a great
deal -of their FALSE modesty has
gone."
There are about a dozen different
American girls in the school, and all
of them intend to go back to the
United States to introduce Jacques
Dalcroze's system.
o o
TO CAMPAIGN TO SAVE HEALTH
OF WOMEN AND GIRL WORKERS
The Women's Trade Union League,
at their Regular meeting yesterday,
outlined an important campaign to
save the health of women and girl
workers.
IJr. Caroline Hedger, who address
ed the meeting, has promised to visit
every member of the Bindery Work
ers' Union and after -that the mem
bers of the Laundry Workers' Union.
To prevent sickness among women
workers, rather than the curing of it,
will be theaim of Dr. Hedger's in
vestigation. The alarming increase in consump
tive women caused by being forced
to work in damp, foul sweatshops has
prompted the league to take this ac
tion. Dr. Hedger, who has just returned
from England and Ireland, tqjd of a
town in the latter country where the
women would 'have been saved from
carrying all the water used by the
inhabitants nearly a mile if Jim Jef
fries -had beaten Jack' Johnson in
their fight
"A wealthy Irishman of that city
had bet a large amount of money on.
Jeffries," said.Dr. Hedger. "He prom
ised that, if he won, he would build
a water, works system at his own ex
pense. The negro won and the wo
men are still carrying the water."
Mrs. Raymond Robins resigned
the president of the local organiza
tion owing to her duties as president
of the National Women's Trade Un
ion League. Miss Agnes Nestor, of
the Glove Workers' Union, wasdect
ed her successor.
Mary'Galvin of the Stenographers'
Union, Elizabeth Maloney of the
Waitresses' Union, and Mrs. Ray
mond Robins were chosen as dele
gates to the annual convention of the
Illinois State Federation of Labor to
be held in October.
o o
UNION SCORES VICTORY
The officials of the organized
bakery workers of Chicago have set
tled the trouble in the Messinger
lunchrooms. An agreement was
reached calling for the complete
unionization of the bakeshops of that
concern.
o o
Captain and crew of th.e ill-fated
steamer State of California, on which "
31 lives were recently lost, have been
exonerated. Blame is placed on the
failure of the government to chart
the Alaskan -Bay properly. Who will
pay the damages?
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