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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 17, 1913, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-09-17/ed-1/seq-13/

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THE NOISE MAKER
ByFlorence Lillian Henderson.
' (Copyright by W. G. Chapman.)
"It's a nervy thing to ask you to do,
'Ailing," spoke the chief clerk of the
Empire National Bank.
"I'm willing to take the risk," smil
ed Gerald Ailing quietly, "for two al
luring reasons."
"Would it be impertinent' for me to
ask what those reasons might be?"
"You are.so good a friend," replied
Ailing promptly, "that I am glad to
A Frightful Alarm.
tell you. First reason: I hail with de
light any variation in my humdrum
work of counting money in. a screen
ed cage. Second reason: I am. in love
with Mr. 'Ward's daughter, Lucy, and
I would like to make a good impres
sion on her father, who, to tell the
truth, rather frowns on my matri
monial aspirations."
"I .see. Very good," laughed the
chief clerk. "I hope this new ex
perience will lead to a consummation
of yourwishes all around."
Young Ailing had been -with the
bank, for three years and was a model
employe. .The Mr. Ward" he spoke of
was the special messenger of the in
stitution. For years, whenever large
amounts of securities or money were
to be delivered, it was the duty of
Ward to attend to it.
The coin transmissions were made
in a wagon guarded by special offi
cers. Mr. Ward disdained such pro
tection. With his money satchel
handcuffed to his wrist he carried
hundreds of thousands of dollars
across the city.
One day his good luck missed him,
As he was passing an open area way
two men hustled him down its steps.
Two others stationed below seized
him. He was knocked senseless with
a slungshot and when he recovered
consciousness the men and satchel
were gone.
Fortunately the amount of cur
rency in the satchel was small, but
over $50,000 in bonds had been se
cured by the bold footpads. They
were of no value to the robbers, but
until they were recovered or proof
positive of their destruction was se
cured, the -bank had to put up a large
bond against them.
Out of all this had grown a sugges
tion from the chief clerk of the bank.
Ward was to carry the money as be
fore, only to distribute about his per
son. He was' to proceed oh his mis
sion secretly from a side exit of the
bank. Gerald was to carry the sat
chel empty.
The hope was that the old gang of
robbers might be on the watch for a
more profitable .opportunity. They
might some day attempt to rob Ger
ald, just as they had Ward. The
former was to keep a close lookout,
was instructed to raise an instant
alarm if attacked. A detectiye was to
follow him within ready call, but not
closely-enough to awaken suspicion.
It was the second day of the new
1 program when Gerald was returning
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