OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 03, 1913, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-10-03/ed-1/seq-20/

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low case to find it stuffed full of sil
verware, documents and jewelry. He
guessed the oracle speedily a bur
glar had looted the Allen home, tak
ing the judge's overcoat as well.
Ned sat downon the front steps
to await the returnof the Aliens.
Soon Leila and her father came into
view.
"Why, Ned!" exclaimed the daugh
ter. "That young man!" growled the
judge. You'll find a better password
than your last one, if you expect to
stay around here."
"Yes, see this is my password on
the present occasion," explained Ned,
as he handed over the stolen plunder
and explained about it.
The judge was fairly delighted to
recover-papers of great value, he de
clared. Ned took heart.'
"Judge Allen," he said manfully,
"tliere's only one password I'll ever
use, if you consent to my plea for
happiness."
"And what's that?" asked the,
judge.
"Leila first, last and all of the
time Leila!"
(Copyright by W. G. Chapman )
o o
! SWEET APPLE PICKLE
Six pounds of sweet apples, peeled
and cored. Stick two whole cloves
in each piece.
Make syrup of three pounds of
sugar and one pint of vinegar. Drop
in a few pieces of apple and cook
until tender, then pack in cans. When
all apples are cooked boil the remain
ing syrup five minutes and turn over
the apples in can and seal while hot.
o o
Some people play and some people
work. Some looks for jobs and others
shirk. Some people sing; some people
try. Some people laugh; some peo
ple cry. Some people long for this
and that. Some think life's good;
some say it's flat. It takes all sorts
of folks you know to make up life's
variety show.
At the club one day, old chap, the
gentleman with whom I was engaged
in conversation was importuned by a
ydung newspaper reporter for an in
terview, or something of the sort, you
know. In voicing his extreme reluc
tance to be quoted in the press, my'
friend expressed himself in this lan
guage: "Nix, young feller, not a bleat, not
a bleat! I never do a spiel for the
sheets, and I don't want to orb my
mug in any of the linotype tapestries.
Just chuck any dope about me out
of the day's news, because modesty
plays center field in my make-up, and
I hate to see myself flashed on the
what's-doing counterpanes. Remem-.
ber, Scrib, I have -protested against
being dragged into 'your extry-extry
library, but don't forget that my label
is spelled with two-TT's!" "
My word!
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