OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 17, 1913, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-12-17/ed-1/seq-7/

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furniture manufacturer. Breach of
promise.
Fortunut Zinzenzdin, 34th and
Morgan sts., fined 200. Indecent exv
posure.
25 municipal bonds sold. Total
$457,000.
Parcel post averaging 215 tons a
day. $1,000,000 worth of stamps
sold in 10 days.
Edward Sweeney fined $10 and
costs. Panhandling.
Thieves shattered window of H. I.
Goldsmith's jewelry store. Frighten
ed away by owner.
No drinks after 1 a. m. on New
Year's eve.
Public schools crowded. Pupils
forced to use basements and attend
half sessions.
$200 reward offered by Mrs. Fan
nie Weinberg, 2066 Milwaukee av.,
for information of missing son, Ben
jamin, 20. Disappeared six months
ago. '
Frank Roberts, 21, "town rowdy,"
Brookfield, shot after terrorizing
town.
$850,000 lowest bid for substruc
ture of municipal recreation pier.
o o
MOB STORM JAIL AND LYNCH
CONVICTED MURDERER
Williston, N. D., Dec. 17. A mob
of fifty men, wearing black masks
and armed with rifles, broke into the
county jail, overpowered Sheriff
Erickson, and carried off Cleve Cul
bertson, recently convicted of mur
dering three members of the Dillon
family on a farm near here.
The lynching, which was the first
in North Dakota since the days of
the famous "bad men" and "dead
shots," was easily carried out owing
to the frail,,s,tructure of the jail.
The doors of offices and cells went
down like tissue paper and Culbert
son, beside himself with fear, leaped
at the leaders of the mob and floored
one man before he was overpowered,
while he shouted in a voice broken
jvith hoarse sobbing: "I ain't the
man I tell you, I ain't the man."
He was almost unconscious when
he was tied to an automobile, while
each member of the mob tried to get
near enough to attack him.
At the end of a thirty-foot rope,
half running and part of the time be
ing dragged over the rough ground,
Culberfson was taken to the bridge
over the little Missouri, then hanged
with a rope fastened to a railing of
the bridge.
The body dropped straight down
for ten or twelve feet before it
brought up with a jerk. Blood spurt
ed from the mouth and ears. But the
frenzied mob was not satisfied. A
f usilade of shots was fired at the dan-,
gling thing, and at least twenty of
them lodged in his body.
The fact that-Culbertson was sen
tenced to life 'imprisonment instead
of being condemned to death for the
murders of John Dillon, his wife and
daughter, Lela. Marsh, on October 21,
at the Dillon farm near Ray, N. D.,
aroused the anger of the populace.
- -o o
MAYBE HE WAS RIGHT
Us Mb
The teacher had a great deal of
trouble making a boy understand a
point in his lesson. Finally, however,
he succeeded, and drawing a lone
breath, remarked:
"If it wasn't for me, you would be
the greatest donkey in this town."
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