OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 23, 1913, NOON EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-12-23/ed-1/seq-14/

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food. But, dear me, I have no idea
what to feed it My heart bleeds at
the searching manner it bends its
long neck and gazes around into my
face with its face.
The poultry Tracks- are strangely
silent about flamingoes. They don't
tell you whether to feed dry mush
or wet mashes, nor whether to give it
scratch feed, nor how high to build
the roosts, nor what is a good remedy
for flamingo cholera.
I know it don't fly, because its
wings have been clipped. I also know
it can swim, because it has web feet.
It's legs are so long, though, that I
don't know what I can give it to swim
in unless I dig a post hole and fill it
full of water. But about all it can
do in that kind of a swimming tank
is to tread water. I think I'll have to
compromise by letting it walk around
in the rain.
A neighbor of ours who is a kind of
a magazine farmer suggests alfalfa.
He says that anything will eat alfalfa.
So I have given it some alfalfa. It
has eaten the alfalfa. It has also
eaten some canary seed.
But it hasn't warbled yet. Very
likely it's bashful.
(Continued)
-o o
ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING
Ingredients Two cups dry, grated
bread crumbs, two cups raisins and
currants, one-half cup sugar, one
half cup syrup, one cup suet, one
teaspoon salt, one teaspoon cinna
mon, several gratings of nutmeg.
Method Remove all skin and
gristle from suet, chop finely and
measure after it is prepared; add
spices, fruit and sugar to bread; rub
together to separate; then rub
through suet; now add the syrup and
stir until mixed. Place in greased
pudding mould, filling mould two
thirds full, cover and set in steamer
and boil three hours without stop
ping. If water boils off have a tea
kettle handy and add boiling water
to lower vessel as needed.
' This pudding is still better if made
a while m advmm iwi v stimed
when needed, so a double quantity
can be made in two or three moulds
and heated when wanted.
A quiet household in which I was
an honored guest, old chap, was sud
denly convulsed by a terrible eruption
of brazen noises. The entire com
pany, save myself, soon regained
composure, and the head of the
house admittecLhis son was practic
ing on the cornet. Qiioth he:
"That bazoo harmony may sound
fierce, but Tom is going to be the
whole brass foundry in that village
cornet band or bust. Take it from
me, that tad was born with talent and
big bellows, and he's going to make
the rest of those rube windjammers
feel like the last gasp of a bent bean
blower. Listen! He's tooting the real
tutti frutti!"
My wordP"'-
o o
Dr. Mary E. Pennington of the De
partment of Agriculture announces
that frozen eggs will be one thing
that'll settle the egg problem. Simple
as the nose on your face. Just make
your hen lay in the refrigerator!

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