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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 10, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-01-10/ed-1/seq-9/

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F 00-YEAR-OLD SQUAW STARVES
IN LAND HER TRIBE OWNED
Katosh, 100-Year-OId Indian Squaw.
San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 10. Old,
bent and shrivelled, tottering 'neath
the weight ofp a hundred years,
Katosh, the oldest woman of the
Hupa Indian tribe, shuffles about
from place to place in Northern Cali
fornia, selling baskets and beats to
seek sustenance from the land that
her forefathers gave to the white
man.
Katosh has lived an eventful like.
Murder, massacre, pestilence and
poverty have stalked in her wake.
She . narrowly escaped death in the
massacre of '49 when the white peo
ple nearly annihilated her tribe. Then
her husband was killed in an Indian
feud' and she was left alone with her
papoose. Later a "squaw-man"
bought her. She learned to love this
white man dearly. And she so fasci
nated him that he wholly forgot his
own people and became Indian
through and through, entering their
ceremonial dances, sweat-houses,
and receiving the attentions of their
medicine men to cure all his ills.
The squaw sang and chanted to
him constantly, praying aloud that
he would renounce his former life
and always live an Indian. But one
day a mysterious poisoned arrow
came into the lodge of Katosh and
killed her husband.
o o
DIARY OF FATHER TIME
The Christmas of 1644 was the
most dismal affair I can remember.
It was in this year that the English
Puritans by act of Parliament or
dered that the twenty-fifth of Decem
ber, should be strictly observed as a
fast, and that all men should humbly
pass it in bemoaning the great na
tional sin, which they had so often
committed on that day, of romping
under the mistletoe, eating boar's
head and drinking ale flavored' with
roasted apples.
In Briton the twenty-fifth of De
cember was a festival long before the
conversion to Christianity, for the
ancient Britons began the year on
December the twenty-fifth and the
very night which is now so holy to
us they called "Mother's Night" by
reason of the ceremonies which they
performed ia that night-Ion vigiL

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