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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 15, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-01-15/ed-1/seq-20/

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CONFESSIONS OF A WIFE
DICK IS HOME
Chapter Lll.
An impatient knock at my door
this morning andDick's voice calling
"Margie ! Margie I'woke me out of a
sound sleep. I ran to the door and
was gathered into his arms.
Once again I had all the thrill that
came to me when Dick first told me
he loved me and I know that he, too,
had not gotten beyond the stage of
romance.
Dick, however, was very nervous
and he wanted me to hurry and dress
so that he could get down to the of
fice. He was full of a business scheme
to circumvent another schoolbook
publishing house which was trying to
get its books in a western school
where Dick's company had always
been solidly intrenched.
He walked up and down the floor
impatiently while I combed my hair,
and at last while I was putting the
finishing touches to my toilet he said:
"Say, Madge, I'll go down and order
breakfast," and rushed out, although
I called that I would not be a minute
more.
I got to the diningroom as quickly
as he did and acquiesced' in the order
of baked apple, buckwheat cakes and
sausage.
"Have you seen mother?" asked
Dick and before I could answer he
said: "We had better go over there
to dinner tonight."
"Oh, Dick, let's, wait until tomor
row. I want you to Bee our rooms
and I thought we would have them
all to ourselves for one evening be
fore anyone else came in."
"Margie, you are a regular baby,"
exclaimed Dick. "I had forgotten all
about those wonderful rooms. We'll
try and give them the proper 'house
warming,' but you had better not tell
the mater that I've arrived, as she
will feel hurt if I don't get over to
see her."
Dick had been eating a prodigious
number of sausages and cakes and
now he reached over and gave my
hand a little squeeze and said: "Well,
so long, Madge. I'll try and be up
early tonight."
"But," I espostulated, "I thought
you would come up and see the
rooms before you went to the office."
"Bother the rooms, they'll keep,
won't they?" he said with a frown,
and th.en noticing how my face fell he
continued in a gentle manner: "I
would not have time to really appre
ciate them this morning. Wait until
tonight, dear, and we'll have a reg
ular party just you and I."
I wonder if I am wrong in my esti
mate of life's values? Just now it
seems to me that Dick should be
more interested in our rooms than his
business. By this I mean, his busi
ness could wait an hour or two while
he spent that time with me.
- I don't want to be a clog in the
wheels of Dick's business success,
neither do I want Dick's business to
always come first.
I am quite sure if I were not mar
ried to Dick he would not have rush
ed off as impatiently.
Maybe it is because business is al
ways a pursuit and a wife and home
is something accomplished is the rea
son why the one holds a man's inter
est ofttimes to the exclusion of the
other.
I am beginning to think that wives
would be happier if they, too, had
something outside of husband and
home to busy themselves about.
(To Be Continued Tomorrow.)
o o
"Gentlemen," shouted the speaker,
"a man is known by his works." He
paused, impressively, but a heckler
took advantage of the pause to yell:
"Then yours must be a gas works."
English capitalists have organized
a $3.25,000,000 combne to manufac
ture soap for the Chinese. For them
selves or for the laundry they wash?

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