OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 27, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-01-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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because it is sick and it would cry
all the time while I was out working.
"Then this morning Mr Bright
came again."
"Is that the first time you have
seen him since he toia-you he would
not pay your rent and" you would
have to go to the. 'Home" for' the
Friendless or they would do nothing
for you?" ' .
"Yes, but they are so busy. Why,
people go there for work and they
can't give them any work. And he
said he's going, to move us out of
here."
"How did he come to change his
mind about sending you to the Home
for the Friendless?" I asked.
"Well, he saw the Sister from St
Mary's and I told her I just wouldn't
go to the Home for the Friendless.
He came this morning and he said
he had seen the sister, and he said
he guessed after all it wouldn't be
such a good plan to send me to the
Home for the Friendless, but he said
he wouldn't pay my rent here. He
said this isn't a- fit place for us."
She paused. She was so very anx
ious, now thaf Mr. Bright is not going
to separate the family, to be fair to
him.
"Of course, since the basement is
not a fit place for you and the chil
dren, Mr. Bright won't move you in
to another basement," I suggested.
. "No, I guess not. But he said' you
can get such nice flats for $10." .
Perhaps I looked sort of skeptical,
that sentence is' very familier to me
tripping from the tongues of the U. C.
rehabilitators so she hastened:
"Well, you- can get pretty nice
flats."
"How much do you pay here?" I
asked.
"Ten dollars a month, and we just
have three rooms, this one and two
little bedrooms, and stove heat."
I didn't bother telling her that $10
flats were pretty much alike, because
it would be a pity to. discourage her
bright hopes, but I asked instcui
"Did Mr. Bright sdy tne United Chan
ties would pay your rent in this lovely
$10 flat they will move you to?"
"Why no he didn't say that."
"Did he say that he would pay up
the money you owe your present
landlady?"
"No, he didn't say he would. He
said he wouldn't pay the rent here for
us to stay here. But I guess he'll
have to pay it here if we move, be
cause I haven't any money."
And further questioning brought'
out the fact that so far as Mr. Bright
and the West Side branch of the U.
C. knew or cared to know, Mrs. Kath
eririe Sims, her two little daughters
and the "laughy" baby might have
suffered from hunger and cold for a
whole week, had she not gone to the
county for aid.
The machinery of the TJ. "C.
squeaks pretty badly, doesn't it?
o o
MOVIE PEOPLE START WAR '
A .war on Major Funkhouser, sec
ond deputy supt. of police, will be
started by the Amusement Protec
tive League, an association of
film manufacturers, exhibitors and
agents.
While the principal object of or
ganizing was to fight the new police
man, whom they say is unfair, they
will also oppose all other-officeholders
who appear to be discriminating
against the movies.
o o
Jgy Raj been putHon hero

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