OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 14, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-02-14/ed-1/seq-8/

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COURT MAY GIVE ANOTHER
CHANCE TO MRS. WAKEFIELD
New Haven, Conn., Feb. 14. Bes
sie Wakefield, the "woman who never
had a chance," is still in the death
house at the -Wethersfield state
prison. .
But the shadow does not rest so
heavily upon her as it did before ttie
granting of her appeal for a hearing
to determine whether she is to have a
s$b new trial.
March 3 the court will sit here,
The day following the state will hang
James Plew, who killed Wakefield
and whose testimony that Bessie was
his accomplice led to her conviction.
Few people here believe . Bessie
Wakefield would ever again be con
victed by a jury.
Thousands upon thousands of peti
tions for pardon were sent to the gov
ernor from ail over the country be
fore the appeal for a hearing upon
the question of a new trial was grant
ed. The board already feels the nation-wide
opposition that has been
manifested to the hanging of an un
' fortunate victim of all that was evil
in the natures of two men whose
wretched chattel she was.
o o
MAD DOG RUNS AMUCK BITES
SEVENTEEN PEOPLE
A cold weather mad dog, the most
dangerous of all the species, accord
ing to the old folks, ran amuck in Og
den Park yesterday and before being
finally-shot and killed had bitten 15
children and 2 adults in addition to
several cats.
The .dog was a Russian terrier
owned by Mrs. Mattie Adams, .6517
Aberdeen street. An examination of
its head showed a developed case of
rabies.
As a result of the dog's short career
of madness the dog catchers were
sent out into the neighborhood and
killed 16 animals.
BIG SUFFRAGET MEET
demonstration in favor of votes for
women will take place tonight at the
Albert Hall, under the auspices of the
National Union of Women's Suffrage
Societies. Tickets for nearly every
one of the 10,000 seats were dispos
ed of some days ago, and the organ
isers of the meeting are confident
tfiat it will be one of the most en
thusiastic in the history of the move
ment in Great Britain.
-TALKS BITTERLY0 AGAINST THE
ATTEMPT. TO BAND MINERS
Denver, Col., Feb. 14. Charging
that Ethelbert Stewart, Dep't of
Labor agent sent here to investigate
the coal strike, said he didn't want
any information from the operators
and that Secretary Wilson had spent
his time with the union men, John C.
Osgood, Pres. Victor-Aiperican'Fuel
Co., and chief spokesman for the
operators, testified in a bitter strain
against the attempt to organize the
coal miners.
He admitted that the operators
have a "tacit agreement," but no
regular organization, and defended
the control by operators of the sa
loons in some districts.
"All of our saloons are orderly,"
he said. "We recognize the right of
our men to drink in moderation and
we believe we can control the amount
of liquor they use if we own the sa
loons."
Under cross-examination he ad
mitted that there had been a "shock
ing number of deaths in Colorado,"
but denied that this was because the
union was not recognized.
o o
WON'T HANDLE SCAB STUFF
Members of the Pressmen's
Union, Locals 3 and 4, employed at
Tony Rubovits' plant, 517 S. 5th ave
nue, went out on strike against be
ing forced to handle scab labor product.
The men's grievance is based on
the fact that they were forced to han
dle forms from the Rogers & Com
pany plant, where a printers' strike
is in progress.

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