OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 05, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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NOON .EDITION
126 WAITRESSES'
CASES COMING UP
IN COURT TODAY
NOON EDITION
WOLGAST WILLING
TO PUT HIS DOUGH
INTO CHICAGO CUBS
THE DAY BOOK
An Adless Daily Newspaper.
N. D. Cochran,
Editor and Publisher.
500 South Peoria St.
398
Tel. Monroe 353.
Automatic 51-422.
By Mail, 50 Cents a Month.
VOL. 3, NO. 133
Chicago, Thursday, March 5, 1914
ONE CENT
DEATH HOVERS NEAR SICK MOTHER
AND HER BROOD OF EIGHT
0 o
TheStory of Helen Davis, Who Went To Work At 14 In
the Mill, Where Consumption Found Her Oat
Her Brothers Also Victims.
BY NLXOLA GREELEY-SMITH
State Tuberculosis - Sanitarium,
Mont Alto, Pa., March 5. Mrs. Mar
garet Davis, wife of a" laborer, and
eight of her children, ranging in age
from 3 to 18, are all stricken with the
terrible disease which men call, the
great white plague, but which is real
ly the blackest plague and the great
est shame pf the human, race because
it is the result of poverty.
The poverty of the Davis family
forced the girls and boys into ;child
slavery. And that unholy slavery
rushed motherland-children into con
sumption. Doctors are inclined to
think that two or three of the nine
MAY live.
The Davis children, started to work
for a living when they were 14 years
of- age. The father and these chil
dren, all. working to maintain the lit
tle home in Dickson City, Pa., got $60
a month.
Two boys, Ralph and Joseph, work
ed in a coal mine, one as breaker boy.
The oldest girl, Helen, was em
ployed in a silk mill. Working ten
hours a day she got $4.50 a week.
The windows of that silk mill were
always closed so that the ends of silk
might not be blown about and in
jured. From the basement great

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