OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 27, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-03-27/ed-1/seq-19/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

feet, you should not covet Verda's
fiance. I have seen him, and he ap
pears to me fo be a decidedly dense
and ordinary person."
"I havelnet him twice," explained
Florence. "I have made an impres
sion upon him, and I intend to fol
low it up. Just as I said; if it is only
for spite, I am going to win Verda
Wayne's lover away from her."
. "All this was the outburst of a bit
ter siren nature that could not brook
any invasion upon its fancied rights.
It was true that the former social
supremacy of Florence King had been
challenged, but it was the sweet,
natural ways of Verda Wayne that
had won her adherents. The Wood
set considered themselves progres
sive, but were really loud. The more
sedate and socially solid element had
chosen Verda for their fair, deserving
queen. Florence sulked and fancied
all kinds of plottings against her. She
declined all invitations Jrom Verda
to ordinary village -functions. She
had' isolated and embittered her own
special friends, and the situation had
grown to be. decidedly strained and
unlovely.
Verda and the entire Wayne family
had been duly attentive to their
young man guest Not much was go
ing on in a social way, but he played
tennis afternoons with a quiet lit
tle group, and evenings wasseen in
their automobile. He was not the
kind of a fellow, one would say, to
appeal to a lively but fastidious little
lady like Verda. Howeve.r, Florence
had heard of an engagement for some
time. She jumped at conclusions and
set her plans to achieve what to her
would be a sweet revenge.
She was a natural born coquette,,
and meeting Mr. tansom once on tne
street knew that the flashing artil
lery of her. eyes had produced a cer
tain effect. The second time he loiter
ed near to her, smiling. The third
time the conventionalities of the
quiet little village were invaded "by
both. They spoke.
"Miss Wayne has told me about
you more than once," asserted Mr.
Ransom.
"Indeed?" replied Florence, brid-
ling.
"Oh, yes, she speaks very highly of
you. She is going away for a week
unexpectedly called to the bedside of
an invalid aunt I shall miss all the
kindness she has shown me. In fact,
I shall be quite lonely."
Affairs turned Florence's way very
speedily after that The siren ways
soon won the pliable heart of young
Ransom. It was a facile conquest,
and Florence wpndered at it as-she
got better acquainted with her suit
or, for such he quickly became. She
saw less of engaging qualities in him
and marveled that he had attracted
Verda Wayne.
Word came that the latter would
return home qn Monday. It was on
the Friday before that Mr. Ransom
laid his heart at the feet of the dark
eyed beauty.
It was the following day when Flor
ence decided on a move to which her
sensational nature warmed. All the
time her main thought was"the dis
may, the possible heartbreak that
would come to Verda Wayne when
she learned that her fiance had prov
en false.
"He comes of a wealthy family,"
mused Florence. "I learn they are
leaders of society in their city. He
is placable, easy to rule. I will give
Wellville something to talk about and
Verda Wayne something to grieve
over."
"Oh! Have you heard the news?"
cried Norma Williams excitedly the
following Monday, meeting Verda
just as she arrived on the morning
train.
"What is it?" inquired Verda.
"Florence has eloped with your
Mr. Ransom!"
"My Mr. Ransom?" echoed Verda,
with a faint smile. "You mean the
gentleman who has been our guest
for the past two weeks?"
"Mr. Harold Ransom yes," replied
Norma, staring in wonder because

xml | txt