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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 01, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-04-01/ed-1/seq-13/

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"CROWNERHNICE:" PLAYS HO&ON BRITAIN'S i
NOBlDTY AND FAMOUSJFlING MAN! ;
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CltldsGrfchne-'WliMe .
f" BY MARY1BOYLE O'REILLY.
London, England, April 1.
America is not the only country that
gets fooled ontitles, nqw and then!
Right here, in England, where they
grow them, one -of the greatest
hoaxes ever put over-an unsuspecting
public has just been played-and all
Britain's "common'folks" are getting
a great laugh over the way royalty
"fell" for Jf!
It happened at the great aeroplane
meet in Jlenden aerpdroine ,and
Claude GraHam-Whiter. famous Brit
ish aeronaut, -Whp -married Dorothy.
Taylor, New York -heiress,- was the
principal actprtie, and "Lord Stan
ton Hope" and&e'crpwjii nrince mof
Wurtemburg," withf various members
I
1
of England's-nobility, as a background
of "merry villagers!" t
Introducing'himself as "Lord Stan- f
ton Hope," a young man of charming-
manners made himself known to Mr.g
Grahame-White at the great flying-i
meet. He said he had brought with
himthecrown prince of Wurtemburg.j,
The prince .then was introduced to ,
Grahame-White, who introduced
them both to-the fashionable throngs
assembled in -the paddock. The.,,
"prince" and "Lord Hope'; at once
inadewthemselves at home with the
society people, and became popular.
"I think --his highness would notp
mind- taking a, flight," - remarked,
"JLprdHqpe" to Mr. Grahame-White. 3
The Vjprince" assented, and in a few"
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