OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 01, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 26

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-05-01/ed-2/seq-26/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

fc
f
ft-
MINERS TOOK THEIR OATH TO KILL FIVE FOR
EVERY ONE MASSACRED AT LUDLOW
BY EDWARD A. EVANS
Trinidad, Col.,G&ay 1. Bullet ana flame have avenged the twenty-twcr
women and children who died by flame and bullet in the Ludlow massacre,
that all day horror of April 20.
The blood debt has been paid in blood by coal mine strikers from
Greece, Italy, and the other countries of Southern Europe men whose
minds never have learned better than to exact the Mosaic penalty of an eye
for an eye.
Except, that these strikers demand a FIVE-FOLD revenge!
And these foreign men were not alone when it came to avenge. There
were Scotchmen and Welshmen and Irishmen in the bands that swept the
' hills, and too, there Were American born men.
Down from the mountain tops today came the story to me of that
death pledge the story and picture of as dramatic a scene as was ever
enacted on American soil.
Over the dead body of Louis Tikas, leader of the Greeks in Ludlow tent
colony, in the presence of the corpses of the little children, these foreign
men who have fought on terrific battlefields in the Balkans and in Tripoli,
took a solemn oath TO KILL FIVE MEN FOR EVERY HUMAN LIFE TAKEN
BY THE MINE GUARDS and uniformed gunmen at Ludlow!
Rifle butts that had pressed shoulders in battling the brutal Turk were
pounded on the floor to give emphasis to the oath and union in revenge was
pledged with clashing steel 01 nne
barrels.
Fulfillment began at Forbes, where
the Rocky Mountain Fuel Co. had a
big mine. Neither entreaties of their
leaders, nor a howling storm of rain
and sleet, could turn the avengers
aside from their purpose and they
made the attack at daybreak.
When they left, three hours later,
at least seven mine guards and
strikebreakers lay dead, many of the
buildings of the mine and camp were
in ashes, and women, children and
unarmed strikebreakers had been al
lowed to seek safety in the mouth of
the mine.
"For," said the strike leaders, "we
don't seek to kill helpless or defense
less ones. We will avenge the death
of our friends on strong, armed men."
Every one of the strikers who at
tacked "Forbes had lived," it is assert
ed, in the Ludlow tent colony, which
now lies in ashes. Many of them
had lost relatives or dear friends in
the massacre there.
But it was not alone the Ludlow
murderers that were paid for by the
mine guards killed at Forbes. That
mine long has been known as one of
the worst in the whole Colorado dis
trict. In it men were forced to work in
human hours, were cheated by dis
honest coal weighers, were robbed by
company stores and were enticed to
spend their money for disgraceful
debauches in company saloons andx
disreputable houses.
At the beginning of the strike,
men from this mine built a tent col
ony in the mouth of Forbes canon.
Once this colony was swept by ma
chine gun bullets fired by treacher
ous guards and men and boys were
killed, and once it was razed by the
state militia, the strikers being left
in a bitter snowstorm, without
homes.
These outrages rankled in their
mediaeval minds, and they grasped
the rifle and the torch the weapons
which had been turned upon them
and their families at Ludlow
TLe arrival of the federal troops
from Fort Leavenworth was the oaly
M . ,-. l .! &i

xml | txt