OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 02, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-07-02/ed-1/seq-8/

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MEN'S ACTION GIVES WOMAN
AND BABY A CHANCE
Mrs. Frances Falls, self-confessed
forger, has been given a chance.
Yesterday the grief -stricken young
woman, who forged to keep herself
and her baby after her husband de
serted her, was arraigned before
Judge Sabath.
Things looked pretty bad for her.
The heavy hand of the law was
upon her. But came there to the
bleak courtroom, quietly and an
nounced, the "good Samaritan." This
was a queer "Samaritan." He wasn't
a preacher, he didn't spout about the
"Golden Rule." He was a distiller.
And he just walked quietly up to
the judge and said: "Myself and
some friends have read of this wo
man's case. I don't think she ought
to be punished. So if the men who
hold those checks will present them
at my office they will be paid in full."
The man was H. D. Graham, part
owner of Graham Bros, and the Ein
stein & Palfrey Co., both distilling
firms. Those who are with Graham
in the good work are Ned Palfrey,
the R. D. Winship Oil Co., and Sheriff,
Dent, Dobyns & Freeman, attorneys.
Graham also brought an attorney
in case she needed a defense. But
she didn't. Judge Sabath smiled
down on her and told her to go free.
Mrs. Falls is back with her baby
in the little flat at 2318 W. Madison
street today.
o o
ANSWERS TO THIS QUESTION
SHOULD BE INTERESTING
"What ideas have you got that will
stop the class war between workers
and employers?"
A State street department store
man, a big non-union factory man
and an employer who has an agree
ment with a labor union will reply to
this question before the federal indus
trial commission when it comes to
Chicago for a three-day stay begin
ning July 14.
Representatives of capital and of
labor, also some people who are sup
posed to be in close sympathy with
both sides, will appear before the
commission. Among the latter will
be Graham Taylor, D. D., Victor Law
son's Daily News star sympathizer
with both capital and labor.
"Constructive suggestions" is what
the commission wants at this July
hearing. Later it will come back and
go for facts back of the suggestions. '
As the commission has power to ad
minister oaths and ask any question
it likes there may be interesting stuff
come out of its short visit.
HEARST PAPERS WIN FIGHT
AGAINST "L" STUB
The Hearst papers won their scrap
to have the Market street stub of the
Oak Park "L" removed yesterday
when City Council Committee on Lo
cal Transportation voted to recom
mend its removal.
Ever since Hearst put up his new
building at Market and Madison
streets he has been fighting this stub.
And now finally he has put it over.
Britton I. Budd, manager of the Chi
cago Elevated Railways Co., says
they'll be hanged if they tear the
structure down, however.
o o
DISAPPOINTED
"Say, mister, are you one of those
old masters?"
"No, indeed, boy. The old masters
are all dead."
"Shucks! Wasn't you even a pallbearer?''
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