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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 11, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-07-11/ed-1/seq-5/

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ONE MAN'S OPINIONS
BY N. D. COCHRAN
Philanthropist Rosenwald. I no
tice that Julius Rosenwald, Chicago's
pet philanthropist, has given $25,000
to another Y. M. C. A That's all
right so far as it goes. I have no
doubt Rosenwald's intentions are
honorable, and that he is doing the
Best he knows how.
But it doesn't go far, and won't
contribute much to humanity's up
lift It makes no difference where
this particular Y. M. C. A. clubhouse
is located. It is the principle of the
thing I am thinking of.
I don't know Rosenwald, but have
been interested in him just S I am
interested in any other very rich man
who has accumulated money exploit
ing men, women and children and
then tries to square himself with God
Almighty or his conscience by giv
ing alms.
Carnegie robbed a large part of the
human family to make many mil-'
lions in the steel industry, and left
poverty and misery wherever he
stopped to gather up wealth. Then
he tried to square himself and is
still at it by building public libraries,
with his name on them, and giving
organs to churches.
Rockefeller is a modern Captain
Kidd, with none of the virtues of the
original; and he has tried to fool God
by giving money to found a Baptist
university and build other monu
ments to himself.
Compared with these two, Julius
Rosenwald is a piker, but he is our
piker Chicago's piker and hence
has local interest. But I think he has
the same fundamental ailment that
.afflicts both Rockefeller and Car
negie IGNORANCE.
Some good is done, undoubtedly,
by the Young Men's Christian Asso
ciation; but after all it is done" for
young men who earn from $15 to $35
a week, and bachelors at that Phil
anthropy builds a fine club for them,
with, gynmasium, swtaming pool,
library and all that; and rents them
rooms to live in, where they get for
a reasonable sum the conveniences
and luxuries of club life.
But that isn't helping the married
man who is trying to raise American
citizens on $2 or $3 a day; and young
married men are more important to
this republic just now than young
single men.
There are married men in Chicago
who don't get enough wages to sup
port their families. They have to
take their boys and girls out of school
as soon as they are old enough to
work and help support the family.
It takes the father and his boys and.
girls to earn enough collectively to
keep the family going; and the
father ought to be .getting in wages
what successful business men and
earnest philanthropists like Rosen
lwald pay the whole family.
It must be ignorance that keeps
Rosenwald from seeing the whple
truth, and that his kind of philan
thropy is merely putting a measly
patch on the seat of a wornout pair
of pants. I am quite sure it isn't
avarice or miserliness. Surely his
heart is all right, for it prompts him
to do things that he is led to believe
will help humanity.
I can't see it any other way than
that he is blind to the truth. Other
wise he would see that he could make
the whole world think and part of it
act, if he would adopt something like
the Ford plan and pay better than a
living wage to every employe m the
great Sears-Roebuck concern.
That policy would not only pay
morally, but it would pay financially.
The newspapers would have to print
the big news, and print it free; and
free advertising is generally the best
advertising. The result would be a
wonderful growth of good will toward
Sears-Roebuck products all over the
country.
It is simple. All there is to it Is liv
ing up to the Golden Rule, and dis
pensing justice, rather than charity
and philanthropy.
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