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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 15, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-07-15/ed-1/seq-18/

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HONOR BRIGHT
By Augustus Goodrich Sherwin.
(Copyrightjjy W- G. Chapman.)
Want came asan armed man upon
the Rhodes family when its head
died, leaving little beside debts.
There was the old house belonging
to a brother of the lawyer, and given
to them rent free, but that was little
MfrsaJ& "ViSsi
"And Cousin Honor Is Coming io
See Us!,k
to an extravagant mother and her
two spoiled and indolent daughters.
"It is dreadful!" mourned Mrs.
Rhodes, after the funeral. "We have
nothing left to us but debts. We shall
have to dispense with the maid"
and the selfish, pampered woman all
but covered with reproach the dead
husband who jiatf' given the best 1
years of his life to sustain in luxury
an ungrateful family.
"And cousin Honor is coming to
see us!" grumbled Eva, the eldest of
the two daughters. Any one of them
was able to work, but they never
thought of that. In the midst of their
predicament Rolfe Daniels called one
evening to see Mrs. Rhodes.
"I do not wish- to allude to your
great loss to distress you," he said,
"but my sense of duty impels me to
seek this interview. Mr. Rhodes was
my best friend. I owe everything to
him."
The widow looked as if she expect
ed pay from this candid avowal.
"Your husband took me into his
office employ when I was homeless,"
went on the young man. .."But for
his death, in a year more through his
kindly tuition I would be eligible for
admission to the bar. I was very
close to him. He worried greatly at
the condition of his finances. He im
plored me to see that his family did
not suffer. Mrs. Rhodes, I am ready
so far as I am able to contribute to
the support of this family until you
can see your way to more permanent
conditions."
"Daniels owes your father a lot of
money and is honest enough to pay
it back," was the coarse, untruthful
way in which Mrs. Rhodes explained
the circumstances to her daughters.
"I presume you expect to continue
my husband's business?" Mrs.
Rhodes intimated to Daniels the fol
lowing day.
"I cannot do that, madam," re
plied Daniels, "'for I have not quali
fied for it I fear I shall have to give
up that ambition. Again, most of
Mr. Rhodes' business was from
clients who wexe his close friends
and which. I could scarcely "hope to
secure." .
"Then "
"I shall seek work in the town, and
if you will give me a room at the
house here it will mimimize my own
personal expenses, and I can help in
tHe, work necessary about the placed
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