OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 16, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-07-16/ed-1/seq-11/

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OF COURSE, YOU CAN FIGURE
THIS OUT! IT ISN'T SO HARD
"How much money have you got?"
asked Willie, who had just lidded to
his pocket money by selling a two
pound box of chocolates for a dollar.
"Half as much as Tom," replied
Walter. "How much have you?"
"Well, I would have five times as
much as I have," said Willie, "if I'd
four times as much as you, supposing
you had four times as much aa you
have."
Now, in order that there may be
no mistake whatever over this little
matter, let me make it clear that
Tom had thrice as much as his sister
would have had, had she possessed a
quarter of the wealth of her cousin
before her cousin spent a third of
her pocket money by going halves
with her best friend in buying the
very box of chocolates which Willie
had just sold.
How much money had Willie?
Why Willie had $1.80, of course.
Figure it out yourself.
o o ' r
HOW LONG DOES YOUR CIGAR
LAST?
What is believed to be a world rec
ord has just been set up at a congress
of South German smokers, held at
Frankfort.
A special trophy was offered to the
smoker who took the longest time to
turn a Mexican cigar into gray-white
ash without letting it go out once.
The competition began at-11 o'clock,
and 200 people contested. By 12
o'clock only 20 competitors were in
the running the rest had regretfully
finished their "weeds" or had laid
them at rest in the ash-tray for too
long.
By 1. o'clock only one smoker was
left Herr Henz, a Sachsenhausen
business man, who actually puffed
away in peace until-he had to throw
his diminutive cigar-stump away,
two hours forty-six minutes and sev
enteen seconds after he had set light
to it,
CHARGE McADOOUSEDKEVENUE
CUTTER FOR'PARTIES
BSw
JWitte.TxCGoocl.
Washington, D. C. Sec'y of the
Treasjiry McAdoo, son-in-law of Pres.
Wilson, is likely to have his "private"
yacht taken away from him. The rea
son is that the private yacht happens
to be a public .yacht, and, according
to Representative Good of Iowa, can
not be used for sailing parties. Good
charges that the revenue cutter
Onondaga has been used for week
end trips by Secretary McAdoo in.
direct violation of the law.
"If the public had the power," he
declares. "It would remove from of
fice a secretary of the treasury who
not only fails to enforce the law, but
violates it himself."
The military cape is popular. It's
invariably lined with startling stripes
or checks.
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