OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 23, 1914, NOON EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-07-23/ed-1/seq-11/

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I J &(&&"
fr?fomypf-Z9Tf?f'l mstsipfef
the forest in the Santa Madre moun
tains 15 miles north of Pasadena for
the time of their lives.
They were first to enjoy the city's
annual outing for boys, girls, women
and families who could not, because
they lacked 'the necessary funds, get
away from the fetid air and stifling
monotony of towering buildings for a
summer vacation.
For two weeks these boys, aged
12 to 14, will camp out under the
guardia'nship of A. A. Dietz, in charge
of the municipal playgrounds depart
ment. The total expenses, including
the 200 miles of transportation, will
be $7.50 each for the entire fortnight
and will be borne by the city of Los
Angeles.
Besides Dietz, seven otheii men,
strong of limb and lithe of body, will
accompany the youngsters to see
that none of the bears, mountain lions
and the like get away with any of
the bold young huntsmen, or any of
their arms, legs or other impedimenta
or paraphernalia necessary to their
well-being. . i
Upon the return of the younger
boys the older lads have their two
weeks of fun, and after that follow
the girls and the women, and later the
families and all because a city finds
that it pays to be humane to its in
habitants! WHATCHAMEAN BY HALCYON?
When the world was young enough
to believe in fables, one of the poetic
stories told was about the kingfisher,
then called the halcyon.
The kingfisher then, -as now, built
her nest on the water and she always
chose the calm days of the winter in
which to nest. But, according to the
fable, she charmed the winds and the
waves so that they remained calm
until her eggs were hatched and her
little ones on the wing.
And so the poets of that time com
pared delightful and happy days to
the days when the kingfisher nested
the halcyon days when everything
was peaceful.
ALL GREAT MEN DRINK; 1 DO
TOO," SAYS VICTOR BERGER
3 vHraSii
"Victo L. Begev.
Milwaukee, "Wis, The flowing
bowl may flow on forever, the foamy
glass may foam, for all Victor Berger,
former socialist congressman, cares.
Milwaukee's -famous socialist told
the state vice commission recently: "I
am a man who takes a drink; all great
men, from -Julius Gaesar down, are
drinking men." Whereupon he de-j
clared he was no champion of John
Barleycorn, but that capitalism and
not alcohol is the real cause of the
world's social problems. Congress-t
man Berger-told the vice commissioni
that dress had more to do with vicef
than drink.
o o f
There are now three negroes sit-i
ting in the French parliament. Theyf
come from the colonial possessions of
France.
English society women have estab-1
lished an institution in which nurses
get three years of training in the care
of dogs and other pets.
$murfitrfmfi&jiifamtit'rit& nt n 2&&
!:&!!;t:4iH(Uy.tj. Vi-i

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